A publication of the Kentucky Center for Public Service Journalism

Chef John Foster: Seasons press on and so do chefs, the most creative are trained as craftsmen and artists

The sun turns over again and the seasons press on. It’s summer, officially on the 21st of June, but it felt like it on and off since April. The garden sensed it long ago, and some vegetables have just disappeared for the year, waiting until the weather, and the time is right again. Chefs move on as well, sometimes beating the bushes this time of year for the first of the summer vegetables to...

Judge declares Kentucky’s pension overhaul unconstitutional, citing process used to enact law

By Tom Latek Kentucky Today Franklin County Circuit Judge Phillip Shepherd has declared a new Kentucky law overhauling the state’s government pension system unconstitutional. Teachers protest the pension overhaul at the Capitol in April. A Franklin Circuit judge has ruled the law unconstitutional. (Photo from Kentucky Today) In a ruling Wednesday, Shepherd took issue with the process lawmakers used...

Liane Crossley: Reduced foal crop could explain sudden surge in Triple Crown winners

The question had been asked for a generation—would the Triple Crown of Thoroughbred racing ever be won again? The question was answered on June 6, 2015 when American Pharoah became the 12th winner of the elusive honor. This past Saturday, Justify added an exclamation point when he, too, completed the sweep. The most recent Triple Crown winner had been the mighty Affirmed who achieved the distinction...

Kentucky State Police say Poor People’s Campaign lacked proper permit to protest inside Capitol

By Tom Latek Kentucky Today There’s a simple explanation why teachers were allowed to protest inside the Capitol this spring and the Poor People’s Campaign was not allowed to protest inside in three separate rallies, Kentucky State Police said.   The Poor People’s Campaign only applied for a permit that let them use the front steps of the Capitol while the teachers filled out the proper paperwork...

State to employ new stategy in attracting innovative new high-tech startups, assisting small businesses

To better serve, attract and develop innovators and startups, Kentucky will deploy a new regional approach to developing high-tech, high-potential-growth businesses, while continuing to assist small businesses seeking support. KY Innovation, the state’s recently launched initiative supporting businesses founders and growing companies, will soon begin implementing Regional Innovation for Startups...

Rates remain high, but fewer kids are smoking; e-cigarettes raise concern about reversing the trend

By Melissa Patrick Kentucky Health News Kentucky’s high-school students continue to smoke at higher rates than their national counterparts, but the good news is that their rates continue to drop. The bad news: An influx of new vaping products could reverse this downward trend. The recently released 2017 Youth Risk Behavior Survey found that 14.3 percent of Kentucky high-school students reported...

Young daughters make long commute worth the sacrifice for Eastern Kentucky University senior

By Madison Harris Special to KyForward When senior aviation major Kristena Cook reflects on her daily life, a 100-mile commute each way from her Louisville home to class at Eastern Kentucky University while juggling her children, education and career amid constant exhaustion, she can only be grateful. “Statistically speaking, this should not be my life,” she said. “I should be locked up, committed...

Sullivan University gains approval for merger with Sullivan College of Technology, Spencerian College

The Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges (SACSCOC) has approved the merger of Sullivan University, the Sullivan College of Technology and Design (SCTD) and Spencerian College into a single entity that will be now known as Sullivan University. The merger will be final on June 22. The current SCTD campus on Atkinson Square Drive will become part of Sullivan University,...

Kentucky Teacher: Big Dig gives kids a firsthand look at the construction industry’s machinery, equipment

By Bobby Ellis Special to KyForward At the Big Dig, there was the sound of running engines, large machines digging up dirt and horns. A lot of horns. The Big Dig, an event open to the public at the Boone County Fairgrounds, gives children and adults the opportunity to sit on and operate different machines from across the construction and building industries. Children were allowed to drive excavators,...

Chef John Foster: It’s finals time for student chefs learning balance between risk-taking, technique

Practical finals are here, with students bent over their tables frantically working away on knife cuts, sauce work, and plate designs. This is when culinary school gets “real” for most of the kids, their first taste of trial under fire when they must make decisions that affect their grades. And believe me, grades are important to some because they determine ranking, scholarships and a...

Kentucky HEALTH to partner with Foundation for a Healthy Kentucky in Medicaid waiver program

The Commonwealth of Kentucky has announced a partnership with the Foundation for a Healthy Kentucky in preparation for the launch of Kentucky HEALTH (Helping to Engage and Achieve Long-Term Health), the state’s innovative Medicaid waiver program. The Foundation for a Healthy Kentucky, a statewide nonprofit focused on health policy and advocacy, will support Kentucky HEALTH’s community engagement...

A yard sale aficionado’s dream, 400 Mile Sale spanning U.S. 68 across Ky runs through Sunday

By Tom Latek Kentucky Today A yard sale aficionado’s dream comes true later this week, with the 400 Mile Sale, taking place along the entire length of U. S. 68 in Kentucky, Thursday through Sunday.   400 Mile Sale spokesperson Debby Spencer said the sale started 14 years ago in hopes of enticing people to get off the interstates and parkways:  “It was hoped that people would shop in the many...

Washington plans to return to UK next season; Gabriel opts to remain in NBA Draft

By Keith Taylor Kentucky Today PJ Washington opted against remaining in the NBA Draft and will return for his sophomore campaign, while Wenyen Gabriel has decided to leave the school. Washington unveiled his future plans on Twitter Wednesday afternoon with a video and the inscription, “I’m back.” Washington participated in the NBA Combine last week and hinted that he would return if he wasn’t...

At 17, she’s on her way to realizing a little girl’s dream — owning an ice cream business, going to UK

By David Kubota NKyTribune reporter As a little girl, Taylor Cook, 17, of Frankfort, had always dreamed of one day owning her own ice cream business, and she also always dreamed of going to the University of Kentucky. When she reached high school, as a member of the Future Farmers of America, she was required to complete a Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) throughout her high school experience....

Warner has shaken up the world of 3D printing with Gorilla Maker; now has big plans for future growth

By Kevin Eigelbach Northern Kentucky Tribune With his Verona-based Gorilla Maker, Glenn Warner has already disrupted the world of 3D printing. As a partner in the Downtown Cincinnati startup Physna, Warner seems poised to help disrupt the world of quality control. Glenn Warner stands in “The Zoo,” that section of the house trailer in Verona where Gorilla Maker makes its 3D printers (photo by Kevin...

As swimming and boating season returns, stay safe with these tips to avoid electric shock around water

With Memorial Day and the start of summer upon us, the risk of electric shock around swimming and boating activities increases. In an effort to keep summertime safe, the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) is reminding people about the potential electrical hazards in swimming pools, hot tubs and spas, in and around boats and marinas. Electric shock drowning (ESD) happens when faulty wiring...

University of Kentucky hospital volunteer Janice Boyd recognized for over 11,000 hours of service

By Hilary Brown Special to KyForward Stop by the gift shop in Pavilion H in the University of Kentucky Chandler Hospital and be greeted with a warm smile and a sympathetic ear. Janice Boyd has volunteered in this gift shop, as well as other parts of Chandler, for over 30 years. She believes the community of patients, doctors and nurses help her just as much as she helps them. “I love the people,”...

Rural Blog: This is how former Marine fighter pilot Amy McGrath won the Democratic primary

The victory of former Marine fighter pilot Amy McGrath in Tuesday’s Democratic primary in Kentucky’s 6th Congressional District was based in part on a strategy of appealing to rural voters, especially through rural newspapers. That was the idea of campaign manager Mark Nickolas, who had quit political work more than a decade ago and “had never worked in a campaign in the digital era,” reports Michael...

Law Enforcement Memorial ceremony at Eastern Kentucky University honors five fallen officers

“At 31 years old, my world was shattered,” said Amy Ellis, widow of Bardstown Police Officer Jason Ellis, who was killed in the line of duty five years ago today. “We lost all our hopes and dreams. I was terrified and angry.” Amy Ellis spoke Thursday during the Kentucky Law Enforcement Memorial ceremony, which honored the lives of five Kentucky officers who died in the line of duty. Ellis...

Chef John Foster: Yummmm, nothing like fresh summer strawberries to tempt the tastebuds

The image of the strawberry, bright red, plump and glistening with morning dew permeates early summer like a beacon. It says welcome to the warm weather, the summer vacation of mind and body, a sigh of relief that the cold grey weather has finally gone. The first of many berries that will grace our tables this season it holds a place of dominance that few other fruits can. With the exception of the...