A publication of the Kentucky Center for Public Service Journalism

Kentucky by Heart: Commonwealth was well-represented in the late 1800s by some colorful writers

Editor’s Note: This column originally appeared at KyForward.com on May 10, 2016 By Steve Flairty KyForward columnist Northern Kentuckian John Uri Lloyd is a sterling example of the “local color” fiction writers who became part of the movement starting in the 1880s in American literature. Defining the term, William S. Ward, in his A Literary History of Kentucky, noted that local colorists “were...

UK Graduate and Lexington teacher Claire Bishop to compete on ‘Jeopardy!’ Teacher’s Tournament

By Lindsey Piercy UK Now Here’s today’s “Daily Double” question: This Lexington teacher will compete in the “Jeopardy!” Teachers Tournament tonight. Answer: Who is Claire Bishop? That’s correct! Bishop, a graduate of the University of Kentucky, is one of 15 upcoming competitors on the long-running TV quiz show. The “Jeopardy! Teachers Tournament”...

Eastern Kentucky University professor David Zurick wins 2017 Nautilus Award for Lyrical Prose

His previous books have illuminated life in the Himalayas and the American South. Now, Eastern Kentucky University Foundation Professor Dr. David Zurick has won one of the publishing industry’s most prestigious honors – a 2017 Nautilus (Silver) Award – for his most recent work. “Morning Coffee at the Goldfish Pond: Seeing a World in the Garden” is one of only three Silver winners in the Lyrical...

UK Cooperative Extension Service, 4-H helps young man share love of animals with others

By Katie Pratt UK College of Agriculture, Food and Environment The Trigg County office of the University of Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service is helping one young man fulfill his dreams. Jonathon Sink, 19, was born with a neurological condition called apraxia, which makes communication difficult for him. While it is challenging for him to speak, Sink has found comfort and calmness interacting...

Chef John Foster: What chefs really want and what chefs get when they choose a culinary career

Imagine if you could, an empty table, clear of food, utensils, plates and napkins. A bare table made by hand, highly polished with light and dark swirls running through the reclaimed wood. Now shift gears to an empty prep table in a small intimate kitchen. Gleaming stainless steel, highly polished by years of prep work, wiping down and more prep work. Overhead lights that are just bright enough, and...

Governor’s Derby Celebration at Old State Capitol to feature exhibits by 16 Kentucky Crafted artists

Sixteen Kentucky artists will exhibit and sell their work during the Governor’s Derby Celebration, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. May 5, on the lawn of the Old State Capitol. The chosen artists represent a diverse sampling of more than 350 artists in the Kentucky Arts Council’s Kentucky Crafted program, an adjudicated program that provides assistance to Kentucky visual and craft artists through marketing and...

Beth Underwood: Typical start to summer, nothing works to do the lawn — except my neighbor

I have a confession to make. My elderly neighbor mowed my yard a couple weeks ago. That’s right. I said it. And suffice it to say when someone 30 years your senior does your yard work — she’s in her mid-80s — it’s nothing to brag about. But it had been one of those weeks, as they say. One of those ‘when-it-rains-it-pours’ kind. Not the kind where one might need rain napper,...

Jamie’s Bookshelf: Rounding out your Spring reading list with nine recently-published nonfiction titles

By Jamie H. Vaught KyForward Columnist This is the second of a two-part series about recently-published nonfiction books. –“Ambition, Pragmatism And Party: A Political Biography Of Gerald R. Ford” by Scott Kaufman (University Press of Kansas, $34.95) captures the former president’s long and remarkable political career. For this 443-page biography, the author also interviewed family...

Kentucky by Heart: Former EKU sports information director Karl Park finds new outlet in horse racing

If you live anywhere in the Richmond area or have been a keen observer of college sports in Kentucky for several decades, the name Karl Park is probably familiar. As Eastern Kentucky University’s sports information director from 1970 until he retired from that role in 2004, his dedication to EKU and quality service to the sporting public garnered him a Colonel’s share of awards along the way, not...

Chef John Foster: We love our pasta — in all forms, but we should try risotto for its versatility and taste

We love our pasta, in just about any conceivable way possible to serve it. It doesn’t even matter that for some pasta has become off limits as gluten allergies continue to rise. Those people seek out alternatives, whether it be rice noodles or sweet potato, even lentils! For those who don’t have to worry about gluten, the choices can be almost staggering and include all semolina, whole wheat,...

Ky. Humanities Council’s new statewide literacy project features Pulitzer winner All the King’s Men

Kentucky Humanities’ new project, Kentucky Reads: All the King’s Men, will use Robert Penn Warren’s Pulitzer Prize-winning novel to guide a statewide conversation on contemporary populism and political discourse, and their relationship to journalism. With funding from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and the National Endowment for the Humanities, as well as cooperation with valued partners, Kentucky...

Beth Underwood: There’s something to be said for reliving those old-fashioned childhood traditions

I’m such a sap when it comes to certain childhood memories and traditions. Take our yearly trips to Gatlinburg, Tennessee, for example. To this day, my list of favorite things to do hasn’t changed much. For starters, give me a visit to the Ole Smoky Candy Kitchen, a footlong corndog from Fannie Farkles, a few rounds of putt-putt at Hillbilly Golf and I’m a happy camper. Topping them all, though,...

WUKY’s fifth Vintage Vinyl Sale kicks off Wednesday with preview show at Habitat for Humanities ReStore

WUKY, UK’s NPR station, kick’s off its fifth Annual Vintage Vinyl Sale Wednesday at the Habitat for Humanities ReStore on Southland Drive with a preview party from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Tickets will be available at the door for $20. The public portion of the sale will be April 26-28 from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. each day. The Vintage Vinyl Sale takes its participants back in time where music was...

Lexington’s Craft Beer Week set for May 11-20; annual event celebrate’s city’s craft beer scene

After yet another year of amazing growth and new breweries, Lexington’s craft brewing community is planning to host the 6th annual Lexington Craft Beer Week. The celebration, organized by LexBeerScene.com, will run from Friday May 11th through Sunday May 20th. The week, featuring special events, tappings and tastings at bars and breweries across the city is sponsored by Alltech Lexington Brewing...

Kentucky by Heart: Some thoughts and musings about Kentucky, the special place we call home

In the course of writing a weekly column called Kentucky by Heart, a book series about everyday heroes in Kentucky, reviewing books of Kentucky’s authors or about the state, and just plain possessing a deep affinity for the place I’ve lived most of my life, you might guess that my Bluegrass mind-set hums continuously. You would be correct. This week, I’ll share some of my thoughts about this...

Pew Research Center: About a quarter of U.S. adults say they are ‘almost constantly online

By Andrew Perrin and JingJing Jiang Pew Research Center As smartphones and other mobile devices have become more widespread, 26% of American adults now report that they go online “almost constantly,” up from 21% in 2015, according to a Pew Research Center survey conducted in January 2018. Overall, 77% of Americans go online on a daily basis. That figure includes the 26% who go online almost constantly,...

Chef John Foster: Mushrooms, mushrooms — so many ways to make them a special part of your meal

The dichotomy of mushrooms always presents an appealing dilemma to me. On the one hand, you have the reverential tones of the aficionados who adore the umami properties of the fungi. On the other, you have the person who innately fears the unknown quality of the plant and manifests that suspicion in their distaste for the texture and flavor of all but the tamest examples. How as a chef do you reconcile...

Beth Underwood: Have a good Kentucky bourbon story you’d like to share? I’d like to hear from you

Have I told you about my family tree? We’ve got one or two real hum-dingers swinging from the branches, that’s for sure. The life and times of one cousin, in particular, has piqued the interest of us all. When his name comes up in conversation, everyone leans in a little closer, keen on catching every word. Kinda like when E.F. Hutton talks. People listen. I’m talking about none other than Bad...

Jamie’s Bookshelf: Eleven recently published nonfiction selections for your spring reading list

By Jamie H. Vaught KyForward Columnist This is the first of a two-part series about recently published nonfiction books. —“Tribe of Mentors: Short Life Advice From The Best In The World” by Timothy Ferriss (Hougton Mifflin Harcourt, $30) is a 598-page hardcover that contains life lessons and career guidance from today’s top performers or achievers from around the world, revealing the wisdom...

Kentucky by Heart: Louisville teenager motivated by helping others, inspires ‘random acts of kindness’

By Steve Flairty KyForward columnist When Shareen Dunn used her Advent calendar as a guide to encourage her son, fifth-grader Andrew, to do simple and loving gestures for others, she often provided some sort of tangible reward. Today, 15-year-old Andrew, a freshman student at Louisville’s duPont Manual High School, doesn’t need those items to motivate him. What spurs him today to do kind things...