Art Lander’s Outdoors: Tree stands offer major advantages to Kentucky deer hunters

Tree stands are capable of taking hunters above the white-tailed deer’s line of sight and smell. That’s a big advantage for archery hunters who take shots at close range. But climbing up and down a tree isn’t without risks. A fall from a tree stand is no laughing matter — the consequences can be life-changing, much worse than a sprained ankle or broken arm. Each season deer hunters...

Art Lander’s Outdoors: If it’s August, it must be time to prepare for a new archery deer season

When August arrives, it’s time to start getting ready for the upcoming archery deer season. Kentucky’s 2017-18 deer season starts with the opening of archery hunting on Saturday, Sept. 2. Last season archery hunters checked in 19,571 deer they harvested, which is about 3 percent below the five-year average archery deer harvest of 20,162. Here’s a checklist, with some tips that will improve your...

Kentucky Afield Outdoors: Wade the Cumberland tailwater if you want to beat the summer heat

By Lee McClellan Special to KyForward The dog days of late summer slow everything down. The heat and humidity along with the long days make outside work sweaty and arduous. Fishing slows during the dog days as well. Catching game fish from a lake or stream during a 90-degree plus day provides a challenge that anglers often fail to conquer. Wading the cold waters of the Cumberland River below Lake Cumberland...

Art Lander’s Outdoors: Eradicating invasive plants, tall fescue grass first step to better wildlife habitat

Landowners who want to improve wildlife habitat on their hunting property should make an effort every year to implement at least one recommended project. At the top of the list should be a continual effort to stop the spread of invasive plants, and eradicate tall fescue grass. It can be frustrating, time consuming and costly, but all that ground work is well worth the effort. Improving habitat benefits...

Kentucky Afield Outdoors: Arrival of Ky. Hunting Guide an encouraging sign for anxious fall hunters

By Kevin Kelly Special to KyForward Fall can seem like an eternity away when the heat index soars into the triple digits and air conditioners must work overtime to meet unrelenting demand. The arrival of the new Kentucky Hunting and Trapping Guide from the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources provides a comforting reassurance that summer is marching closer to fall. The free guide ships...

State Fish and Wildlife Department seeking input on entrepreneurial solutions for Asian carp problem

Asian carp swim by the millions in Kentucky’s waterways, threatening to crowd out native fish in some of the state’s most cherished fishing destinations – including Kentucky and Barkley lakes in the west. With an absence of predators and little natural controls available for these invasive species, the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources, the state Tourism, Arts and Heritage Cabinet...

Art Lander’s Outdoors: The good times are long over, but memories remain from beloved first pickup truck

When the good times were rolling. Our kids and dogs in the bed of my first pickup truck. (Photo from Art Lander Jr.) Author’s Note: I recently found this column I wrote 23 years ago, dated Feb. 6, 1994. I hope readers can relate to this column because of the good times they had with their first pickup truck. We were joined on a sunny April afternoon in 1983 — a free spirit and an eager help-mate. We...

Kentucky Afield Outdoors: Use the Kentucky Fish and Wildlife website to find a great place to fish

By Lee McClellan Special to KyForward Two employees of the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources recently used the department’s website at www.fw.ky.gov to glean information on catching saugeye. They used the 5-foot contour maps on the “Find a Place to Fish” to study the bottom of Guist Creek Lake in Shelby County and determine a place to fish. They later fished those areas and caught...

Art Lander’s Outdoors: How to use trails cameras on your property; tips on mounting, retrieving images

This is part two of a two-part series on the evolution of remote cameras from the film era to today’s infrared digital scouting cameras, and how trail cameras are used by deer and wild turkey hunters. Hunters wish they knew more about the white-tailed deer and wild turkeys on their hunting property. But only so much can be learned from boots on the ground scouting. It’s impossible to be everywhere...

Kentucky Afield Outdoors: Experimental stocking of fast-growing saugeye offers anglers another option

By Kevin Kelly Special to KyForward With every passing season, anglers are building their knowledge base about how to catch saugeye stocked in a handful of central and northern Kentucky lakes. A saugeye is a fast-growing cross between a walleye and sauger that can reach 15 to 19 inches in its second year. The hybridization is evident in the species’ physical appearance. Saugeye display the faint...

Art Lander’s Outdoors: From film to digital, remote cameras have been used by hunters for ages

This is part one of a two-part series on the evolution of remote cameras from the film era to today’s infrared digital scouting cameras, and how trail cameras are used by deer and wild turkey hunters. Using remote cameras to capture images of wildlife dates back much farther in the past than probably imagined. In the infancy of film photography in the late 19th century, innovative wildlife photographers...

Kentucky Afield Outdoors: Like the summer temps, Lake Cumberland striped bass are heating up

By Lee McClellan Special to KyForward Few things in the outdoors in Kentucky can top being on Lake Cumberland at daybreak on a summer morning, watching a planer board or large bobber disappear, followed by the sound of a slipping drag. Striped bass pull like no other fish in Kentucky and landing a 22-inch or longer keeper brings a rush of adrenaline that gives you the shakes. Now in the fourth year...

Art Lander’s Outdoors: Raccoons in the attic? Nuisance wildlife no laughing matter for people, pets

Kentucky is blessed with a diversity of wildlife – some 74 species of mammals, 380 species of birds, and 112 species of reptiles and amphibians. Many landowners encourage wildlife on their property and spend countless hours and considerable sums of money to improve habitat for rabbits and quail, white-tailed deer and wild turkeys. But when a family of raccoons takes up residence in the attic, or...

Kentucky Afield Outdoors: A few tips on how to choose the best kayak for flat water fishing

By Lee McClellan Special to KyForward A car, truck or sport utility vehicle with a couple of kayaks on the roof with fishing poles visible through the back window is an increasingly common sight on Kentucky highways. Sales data shows kayak fishing and related kayak accessories increasing in popularity. Some of this popularity has to do with many baby boomers reaching retirement age and wanting a new...

Art Lander’s Outdoors: Early Kentucky’s era of exploitation awakened conservation movement

This second article in a two-part series, in honor of Kentucky’s 225th anniversary of statehood, focuses on the 150 years from 1750 to 1900, with a timeline of human use of natural resources. The research for this article is courtesy of the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources. Kentucky’s historical era began when Virginia physician and land speculator Thomas Walker passed through...

Kentucky Afield Outdoors: Newly published plan to bring back ruffed grouse comes into focus

By Kevin Kelly Special to KyForward A newly published plan developed by the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources offers a long-range strategy to help ruffed grouse populations rebound in eastern Kentucky after years of decline. The Ruffed Grouse and Young Forest Strategic Plan looks 10 years out and its success hinges on an array of partners working together to create the young forest...

Art Lander’s Outdoors: State’s 225th anniversary recalls Kentucky’s early bountiful resources, native peoples

First of two-part series, in honor of Kentucky’s 225th anniversary of statehood, explores the flora and fauna of early Kentucky, Native American cultures, and human use of natural resources during pre-history. The research for this article is courtesy of the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources. Just as the giants of the Pleistocene Era (Ice Age) were dying out, a primitive stone age...

Kentucky Afield Outdoors: Fun the key to encourage your young angler’s growing interest this summer

By Kevin Kelly Special to KyForward If free fishing weekend was a home run with your kiddos, you might be wondering about how to keep the momentum going throughout the summer. Take a cue from them: keep it fun. Does this mean they need to catch a fish or get a bite every cast? Not necessarily. Fun can be wading a creek or floating down one for the first time in a canoe or kayak. Fun can be seeing how...

Art Lander’s Outdoors: Once upon a time, American bison was free-ranging native Kentucky species

During Kentucky’s pioneer era, longhunters and early explorers feasted on buffalo steaks and roasts. Herds were vast and had a significant impact on the land, grazing down vegetation as they traveled, and creating an extensive network of wide trails throughout the state. Many of Kentucky’s buffalo trails served as primitive roads for early explorers, and eventually became state and federal highways...

Kentucky Afield Outdoors: Here are two excellent options for combating early summer fishing blues

By Lee McClellan Special to KyForward (This is the ninth and final installment of the “Spring Fishing Fever” series of articles, detailing productive fishing techniques and opportunities across Kentucky. An archive of past articles is available on the department’s website at www.fw.ky.gov). June is one of the best months for outside activities such as fishing. However, many predator species,...