Lexington Art League builds Inter/Struct exhibits with multiple artists at historic sites

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Members of the international artist collective Expanded Draught are already working in the severely dated interior of the 200-year-old Pope Villa in anticipation of the Oct. 3 opening. (Photo from LAL/Facebook)

Members of the international artist collective Expanded Draught are already working in the severely dated interior of the 200-year-old Pope Villa in anticipation of the Oct. 3 opening. (Photo from LAL/Facebook)

 
Lexington Art League kicks off a unique three-month art exhibit in multiple venues involving multiple artists on Oct. 3.
 
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Inter/Struct Fall 2014 involves 18 artists from 10 states and three countries creating works in non-art spaces that are site-specific. The collaborating artist groups and individuals have been asked to create “new works in response to a specific location” and to consider the location’s architecture, history, place and other information to “redefine the space through art.”
 
The league hopes the works “will activate space and offer transportive experiences for all who move through them,” according to its website found here.
 
Pope Villa
 
The first in the series is entitled if the walls could talk and features a large, mixed-media installation by international artist collective Expanded Draught. The historic venue at 326 Grosvenor in downtown Lexington is considered the best surviving domestic design by U.S. Capitol architect Benjamin Henry Latrobe.
 
Latrobe designed the mansion in 1810-11 for Sen. John and Eliza Pope whom he met while John Pope was serving in the U.S. Senate in Washington, D.C. Pope, a Kentucky lawyer and politician, worked closely with Latrobe on multiple highways, bridges and canals throughout the western part of the country. Eliza Pope assisted Latrobe with the home design and was the sister-in-law of John Quincy Adams.
 

   Members of the collective gather outside the columns of Pope Villa on Grosvenor. (Photo from LAL/Facebook)

Members of the collective gather outside the columns of Pope Villa on Grosvenor. (Photo from LAL/Facebook)

An opening reception will be held at the Pope Villa on Oct. 3 from 6-9 p.m. The exhibit will be free and open to the public on Wednesdays through Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.
 
Night Market
 
The second and third in the series will open during Night Market in the NoLi (North Limestone) neighborhood on Friday, Nov. 7, from 7-11 p.m.
 
Both Inter/Struct exhibits are within walking distance of the market. Chicago-based artist Rebecca Hamlin Green will explore the themes of home, nostalgia, history and identity in her This Remains to Be Seen exhibit of mixed media at 128 York St.
 
Tennessee artists Juan Rojo and Cedar Nordbye will ask questions about the institution of marriage and its often accompanying homeownership, as well as the evolution of American identity. Their installation is called Partnership House and is at 740 North Limestone. An opening reception will be held at both sites on Nov. 7 from 7-11 p.m. and they will be open for public viewing by appointment through Nov. 21.
 
Gallery Hop
 
Two more Inter/Struct installations will be revealed during the final 2014 Gallery Hop on Friday, Nov. 21, from 5-8 p.m. Both are in the Distillery District at 1170 and 1228 Manchester St.
 
The first is in the historic James Pepper Barrel Warehouse at 1170 Manchester. Ohio-based artist Taryn McMahon will use the rich history of Kentucky bourbon as inspiration for her Raised from the Seeds Sown in Spring. The installation is made of cascading translucent paper curtains with hand-printed images of rye, corn, wheat, barley and oak, all of which are used to make bourbon.
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The second is by Knoxville-based artist Jason Sheridan Brown and is also on the Pepper Distillery campus at 1228 Manchester. Untitled thus far, his installation explores the relationships between coal, the railroad and Kentucky industry. Both exhibits will remain installed through Dec. 5 and can be seen by appointment.
 
The league’s current exhibit – Victory Without Fanfare – is still available for viewing through Oct. 5 at Loudon House located at 209 Castlewood Dr. in Lexington. Gallery hours are Tuesday through Friday, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. and Saturday and Sunday from 1-4 p.m. The exhibit results from three months of residency by guest artists Lori Larusso and Melissa Vandenberg. To read more about this exhibit, see the league’s Facebook page.

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