Science Guy: Using the power of the sun, it’s possible to pop a balloon — inside another balloon

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterPin on PinterestShare on LinkedInShare on StumbleUponShare on RedditEmail this to someone

Have you ever popped a balloon inside a balloon? If not, our “Science Guy” Jason Lindsey and a kid scientist show us how by using the power of the sun.
Go to – and click on Hooked on Science for this experiment and others that might get you and the entire family “Hooked on Science.”

Pop a Balloon Inside a Balloon

INGREDIENTS

• Magnifying Glass

• Black Balloon

• Clear Balloon

INSTRUCTIONS

STEP 1: Push the black balloon inside the clear balloon. Inflate the black balloon. Tie the black balloon.

STEP 2: Inflate the clear balloon, so the black balloon can move freely inside the clear balloon. Tie the clear balloon.

STEP 3: Using the magnifying glass, focus the sun’s rays through the clear balloon, to the black balloon, and observe. Describe what happens when you place the clear balloon in the path of the rays of sunlight. Provide evidence that energy was transferred to the black balloon by the rays of sunlight.

EXPLANATION

The black balloon quickly pops. The magnifying glass allows you to concentrate the sun’s rays through the transparent balloon to one spot on the opaque or black balloon, which eventually weakens the rubber, causing the balloon to pop. The black balloon pops while the transparent balloon stays inflated.

The black balloon absorbs the sun’s rays causing the balloon to heat up faster.

To see more Science Guy experiments, click here.

Visit www.hookedonscience.org for more fun and get your family “Hooked on Science.”

JasonLindsey-345x306

Jason Lindsey is an award-winning science educator and author. Jason studied science and journalism at Western Kentucky University, focusing on general science with an emphasis in meteorology and climatology. Each year he performs hands-on science experiments at hundreds of schools and community events throughout the United States, as well as produces and hosts a hands-on science segment airing on television stations across the nation. He previously worked as a chief meteorologist, backpack journalist, science reporter and webmaster.

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterPin on PinterestShare on LinkedInShare on StumbleUponShare on RedditEmail this to someone

Related Posts

Leave a Comment