Art Lander’s Outdoors: Good weather forecast predicted for Kentucky’s late fall turkey season

A warming trend will create good hunting conditions for the opening weekend of Kentucky’s late fall wild turkey season. The second of two fall seasons open to hunting with shotguns, the seven-day season opens tomorrow, Saturday, December 2 and continues through Friday, December 8. The forecast is calling for above normal temperatures in Central Kentucky Saturday and Sunday, then a chance of rain...

Art Lander: Predators of the night, Kentucky’s most common owls; have incredible hearing, acute vision

They are predators of the night. Most active from twilight to dawn, they are able to locate prey in darkness because of their incredible sense of hearing and acute vision. Owls have large, forward-facing eyes and a facial disk that acts as a parabolic reflector, enabling them to precisely locate sounds. Some species have asymmetrical ears that aid in homing in on these sounds. Soft plumage makes them...

Art Lander’s Outdoors: From film to digital, remote cameras have been used by hunters for ages

This is part one of a two-part series on the evolution of remote cameras from the film era to today’s infrared digital scouting cameras, and how trail cameras are used by deer and wild turkey hunters. Using remote cameras to capture images of wildlife dates back much farther in the past than probably imagined. In the infancy of film photography in the late 19th century, innovative wildlife photographers...

Art Lander’s Outdoors: Early Kentucky’s era of exploitation awakened conservation movement

This second article in a two-part series, in honor of Kentucky’s 225th anniversary of statehood, focuses on the 150 years from 1750 to 1900, with a timeline of human use of natural resources. The research for this article is courtesy of the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources. Kentucky’s historical era began when Virginia physician and land speculator Thomas Walker passed through...

Art Lander’s Outdoors: Once upon a time, American bison was free-ranging native Kentucky species

During Kentucky’s pioneer era, longhunters and early explorers feasted on buffalo steaks and roasts. Herds were vast and had a significant impact on the land, grazing down vegetation as they traveled, and creating an extensive network of wide trails throughout the state. Many of Kentucky’s buffalo trails served as primitive roads for early explorers, and eventually became state and federal highways...

Art Lander’s Outdoors: It’s a dangerous world out there, but wildlife finds a way to survive and thrive

A Cooper’s hawk snatches a young squirrel from the side of a tree, a red fox finds a nest of newborn rabbits in an overgrown field, and a largemouth bass ambushes an unsuspecting school of minnows. These are all examples of predation, the drama of predator versus prey, that plays out everyday in Kentucky’s woods, fields and waterways. Many species of wildlife prey on (eat) other animals to survive...

Art Lander’s Outdoors: Of all the Asian exotic threats to woodlands, chestnut blight stands out as worst

Anglers bemoan the scourge of Asian carp — silver and bighead carp — fouling our rivers and lakes at the expense of bass, crappie, striped bass, walleye and other game fish. Land managers spend thousands of dollars and man hours eradicating Asian Bush Honeysuckle, which forms dense thickets in forest understories, shading out, and out-competing native vegetation, posing a threat not only...

Art Lander’s Outdoors: Much more than a toy, the slingshot has come of age as legal hunting weapon

Charles Goodyear’s process of making vulcanized rubber was revolutionary, leading to the eventual creation of a wide range of products beneficial to society — from automobile tires to inflatable life jackets. But the development of the slingshot was likely an unintended consequence of the self-taught chemist and manufacturing engineer’s invention, which was patented on June 15, 1844. The...

Art Lander’s Outdoors: Kentucky’s spring squirrel hunting season has deep historical roots

Hunting squirrels is a tradition that dates back to early Kentucky. During the settlement era, as other wild game became scarce, subsistence hunters turned their attention to squirrels to feed their families, taking them with small-caliber flintlock longrifles and smooth bore fowlers, loaded with shot. In Kentucky’s vast forests, squirrels are abundant, and active throughout most of the year. According...

Art Lander’s Outdoors: Rising water temperatures result in best largemouth bass fishing of the year

When water temperatures in Kentucky’s small lakes, streams and major reservoirs rise into the mid-to-upper 60s largemouth bass begin feeding along the shoreline, in preparation for spawning. For fly fishermen it’s the start of some of the best largemouth bass fishing of the year. This “topwater” action continues post-spawn into May, when water temperatures warm into the mid-to-upper 70s, and...

Art Lander’s Outdoors: Vertical jigging for walleye, sauger, saugeye — Spring’s overlooked presentation

Vertical jigging may be the most overlooked presentation for catching walleye, sauger and saugeye in Kentucky’s lakes and rivers during the spring. In March and April these fish stack up below dams in rivers and lake tailwaters, and move into the headwaters of reservoirs, drawn by the current from feeder creeks and rivers. They school by size and concentrate around bottom structure, facing into...

Art Lander’s Outdoors: A quality decoy can provide wild turkey hunters with an advantage

It has happened to every wild turkey hunter. A gobbler responds to calling and moves towards the hunter, but abruptly stops, and hangs up just out of gun range. The hunter can see the gobbler but the gobbler doesn’t see a hen — what he thinks is the source of those seductive clucks and yelps. It’s a situation where hunting with a quality decoy could have been the difference between just another...

Art Lander’s Outdoors: With warmer weather, lots of food options, spring turkey season looks promising

With Kentucky’s spring wild turkey season on the horizon, the outlook is promising. A number of factors seem to point to better than average hunting conditions and flock status. Hens and gobblers are in excellent body condition after a heavy mast crop last fall, and a mild winter. The AccuWeather forecast for Central Kentucky is calling for average to above average temperatures, with near normal...

Art Lander’s Outdoors: The eagle has landed — survived and flourished — back from the brink

This is the last of a two-part series on the comeback of America’s national symbol. On July 12, 1995 federal biologists believed that populations had recovered enough so that the bald eagle could be taken off the endangered species list, and designated as a threatened species. That designation lasted just 12 years. Secretary of the Interior Dirk Kempthorne announced the delisting of the bald eagle...

Art Lander’s Outdoors: Bald Eagle nesting resurgence — back from the brink of extinction

This is the first of a two-part series on the comeback of America’s national symbol. The Bald Eagle’s comeback from the brink of extinction is one of our country’s greatest conservation success stories. In Kentucky today there are more eagle habitat, and the number of nesting pairs of eagles may actually be higher than during the late 18th century, when explorers, long hunters and settlers first...

Art Lander’s Outdoors: Don’t forget the squirrels — Kentucky hunting season’s last hurrah

A still afternoon is the ideal time to enjoy a few hours in the woods squirrel hunting. The season will be over soon, so don’t pass up the opportunity, especially when temperatures moderate. There are plenty of squirrels in Kentucky’s woodlands, and bag limits are generous. Kentucky’s fall 2016-17 squirrel season ends Feb. 28. The daily bag limit is six squirrels. There’s a higher percentage...

Art Lander’s Outdoors: Driving Kentucky’s backroads reveals the aerial artistry of the American kestrel

Drive through Central Kentucky backroads and you might get to witness the aerial artistry of the American kestrel (Falco sparverius). These diminutive falcons can often be seen perched on a roadside telephone pole or wire, but what makes them so easy to spot is their signature move — hovering in mid air by rapidly beating their wings, then diving down on prey with outstretched talons. Distribution The...

Art Lander’s Outdoors: Singing the praises of the remarkable Northern Cardinal

The Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis) brightens up cold winter days with visits to backyard feeders. In Kentucky, the widely used common name for this native songbird is “Redbird.” Coloration is distinctive. Both sexes sport red crests on their heads, and masks on their faces — black for the male, and gray for the female. The males’ feathers are a crimson red, while the females’...

Art Lander’s Outdoors: Barn owl rare species in Commonwealth; inventory finds increase in nesting

The Barn Owl (Tyto alba) is uncommon to rare in Kentucky, yet worldwide it’s one of the most widely distributed of all owl species. “We have been studying Barn Owls since the 1990s,” said Kate Slankard, a raptor biologist with the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources. “At that time the population was really low. We were only able to find about 25 nests statewide.” In 2005, the...

Art Lander’s Outdoors: Saugeye stocked in five central Kentucky lakes; new fishery blossoms

It’s a walleye, a sauger, no, a saugeye. This hybrid member of the perch family (Percidae), is a cross between female walleye (Sander vitreus), and a male sauger (Sander canadensis). It’s a new fishery that has quietly blossomed, since five Central Kentucky lakes were stocked, beginning in 2013. In the wild, in lakes and rivers with naturally reproducing populations of both walleye and sauger,...