A publication of the Kentucky Center for Public Service Journalism

Will your sunglasses prevent serious eye disease? Kentucky Academy of Eye Physicians offers tips

With summer in full swing, the days are longer, the sun is hotter, and the threat from the sun’s damaging ultraviolet rays is greater. Excess sun exposure can put you at risk of serious short-term and long-term eye problems. This is true for young and old people, year-round. Prevention is simple. Wear sunglasses that block ultraviolet radiation. But how do you know if your sunglasses are up to the...

Healthy Vision Month: Women more likely to suffer from sight-threatening disease; here are some tips

Studies show there is a gender gap in eye disease. Women are more likely than men to suffer from sight-threatening conditions such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD), cataracts, and glaucoma.1 In support of Healthy Vision Month in May, the Kentucky Academy of Eye Physicians and Surgeons and the American Academy of Ophthalmology remind seniors to make vision a top priority. Women make up 65...

Basketball, baseball and air/paintball guns top cause most eye injuries, KAEPS offers some safety tips

More than 40 percent of eye injuries that occur every year are related to sports or recreational activities. A recent study found that about 30,000 people in the U.S. went to an emergency department with a sports-related eye injury, a substantially higher estimate than previously reported. Three sports accounted for almost half of all injuries: basketball, baseball and air/paintball guns. Basketball...

KAEPS warns that 90 percent of work-related eye injuries can be avoided by wearing eye protection

On-the-job safety goes well beyond avoiding slips, falls and heavy lifting. Caring for your eyes should be a high priority and part of an overall workplace wellness routine. Each day, about 2,000 U.S. workers sustain a job-related eye injury that requires medical treatment. However, 90 percent of these accidents can be avoided by wearing eye protection. As part of an ongoing effort to stress the importance...

KAEPS reminds those at high risk of for Glaucoma that early detection is key to successful treatment

Glaucoma is a major cause of vision loss worldwide. It affects more than 3 million people in the United States—nearly half of whom are unaware they have the disease. During Glaucoma Awareness Month in January, the Kentucky Academy of Eye Physicians and Surgeons (KAEPS) joins the American Academy of Ophthalmology in reminding the public that early detection and treatment can help protect your sight. Glaucoma...

KAEPS urging shoppers to consider eye safety when shopping for toys this holiday sesason

With the holiday shopping season now in full swing, the Kentucky Academy of Eye Physicians and Surgeons (KAEPS) joins the American Academy of Ophthalmology in reminding the public of certain safety guidelines when choosing the perfect gifts for little ones in their lives. A number of recent studies have shown that some popular toy types are commonly associated with childhood eye injuries. These include...

Eye physicians stress importance of annual eye exams during Diabetic Eye Disease Awareness Month

People with diabetes are at increased risk of developing serious eye diseases, yet most do not have sight-saving, annual eye exams, according to a large study. This is especially timely as the Kentucky Academy of Eye Physicians and Surgeons (KAEPS) joins the Academy in reiterating the importance of eye exams during the month of November, which is observed as Diabetic Eye Disease Awareness Month. Researchers...

Non-prescription contacts might make the perfect costume, but opthalmologists say they carry big risks

Zombie or devil contact lenses may elevate a Halloween costume’s fright factor, but wearing them without a prescription could result in something far more terrifying – blindness. The Kentucky Academy of Eye Physicians and Surgeons (KAEPS) joins the American Academy of Ophthalmology in urging Halloween shoppers to understand the risks of wearing over-the-counter contact lenses. While it is illegal...