A nonprofit publication of the Kentucky Center for Public Service Journalism

Art Lander’s Outdoors: Hunters, anglers can never have too many tools for different outdoor chores


Hunters and anglers can’t have too many knives.

It’s not about hoarding or collecting, but rather having the right tool for every job.

We’re talking primarily about blades for eviscerating, skinning, and de-boning game, including shears and saws to aid in the butchering, and tools to scale, skin, and fillet fish.

All these tools, and more, are needed for the wide range of outdoor chores.

Here’s some examples:

• The backcountry trout angler travels light, carrying everything in a backpack for a night or two off the beaten path. That includes a tent, sleeping bag, small gas stove, cooking utensils, food, pack rod, reel, lures, fishing vest and other gear.

The ultimate tool for a backcountry fishing adventure might be the Case Amber Bone Hobo Knife, which has a stainless steel blade, fork and spoon. You can clean your catch and eat in style.

If trout is on the menu, a folding blade knife is all that’s needed for cleaning and cutting up small trout.

The ultimate tool for this kind of backcountry fishing adventure might be the Case Amber Bone Hobo Knife, which has a stainless steel blade, fork and spoon. You can clean your catch and eat in style.

Search for this beautiful, but functional knife, and find a local dealer at www.wrcase.com

• A sheath knife with a short drop point blade is a good choice for the small game hunter, just the perfect size for eviscerating rabbits, squirrels, or game birds in the field, before putting them in the game bag of a hunting vest.

Check out the Buck 538 Open Season Small Game fixed blade knife. It has a 4 1/4-inch drop point stainless steel blade, contoured Redwood handle, and comes with a black polyester sheath.

Get more details on their website at
www.buckknives.com

Another useful tool the for small game hunter is a pair of game shears, also referred to by chefs as poultry scissors or kitchen shears.

The Gerber Vital Take-A-Part Shears are heavy duty 8-inch scissors with comfort handles, and a belt sheath for taking the shears afield. The serrated blades easily cut through wing bones, leg bones, breastbone and the ribs of small game animals.

These shears also come in handy for cutting a whole chicken in half in preparation for BBQ grilling or smoking.

For more information visit their website at: www.gerbergear.com

• From field to freezer, several different knives are needed to disembowel, skin, de-bone and butcher a white-tailed deer.

But one of the tools often overlooked is a folding hand saw, which makes cutting through the deer’s sternum and pelvis a fast, and easy chore when field dressing a deer in the woods.

The Buck 538 Open Season Small Game fixed blade knife has a 4 1/4-inch drop point stainless steel blade, contoured Redwood handle, and comes with a black polyester sheath.

A folding saw should be in every archery deer hunter’s pack for another good reason. When hunting from a treestand if a limb or branch is in your way when drawing your bow, or blocking you from shooting through an opening, simply saw it off.

Wicked Tree Gear, of Kerrville, Texas, sells a line of high quality hand and pole saws for the deer hunter.

Their folding hand saws have a cast aluminum handle, hardened locking hardware, and high carbon steel blades.

The product line also includes a bone saw, ideal for quartering and butchering game in the field.

Visit their website at: www.wickedtreegear.com

• Boneless, skinless fish fillets, deep fried or baked, are delicious. If you want to clean your catch this way, you need a quality fillet knife, to cut the flesh away from the bone, and remove the skin off the fillet.

Rapala has been selling quality fillet knives for over 50 years. Their Fish ‘N Fillet series is an industry classic, featuring birch handles, stainless steel blades, polished brass ferrules and tooled leather sheaths. Blade lengths offered include 4, 6, 7 1/2 and 9 inches.

Visit their website at: www.rapala.com

Hunters and anglers are obsessed with knives, and related tools. Not one of them was ever overheard saying, “I don’t need another knife.”

 Art Lander Jr. is outdoors editor for KyForward. He is a native Kentuckian, a graduate of Western Kentucky University and a life-long hunter, angler, gardener and nature enthusiast. He has worked as a newspaper columnist, magazine journalist and author and is a former staff writer for Kentucky Afield Magazine, editor of the annual Kentucky Hunting & Trapping Guide and Kentucky Spring Hunting Guide, and co-writer of the Kentucky Afield Outdoors newspaper column.

Related Posts

Leave a Comment