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Bryan Station High School’s StationARTS program has new coordinator and new look


StationARTS students choose a major and follow a track of study on a defined path. Their options range from band, orchestra, vocal music and classical guitar to visual arts, drama and dance. Technical theater and piano keyboard are under development. (Photo by Tammy L. Lane)

StationARTS students choose a major and follow a track of study on a defined path. Their options range from band, orchestra, vocal music and classical guitar to visual arts, drama and dance. Technical theater and piano keyboard are under development. (Photo by Tammy L. Lane)

 
By Tammy L. Lane
Special to KyForward
 
As the new coordinator, Kristine Lyon envisions bright prospects for the revamped and expanded StationARTS program, which is now open to students across Fayette County Public Schools.
 
“We’re not necessarily looking for refined talent,” she said. “We think there’s a wealth of talent out there that’s unmined.”
 
StationARTS students choose a major – preferably in their freshman year – and follow a track of study on a defined path. Their options range from band, orchestra, vocal music and classical guitar to visual arts, drama and dance. In addition, technical theater and piano keyboard are under development. Music majors could see a lot of Lyon, who teaches chorus, AP music theory and beginning keyboard.
 

(Photo by Tammy L. Lane)

(Photo by Tammy L. Lane)

 
While the former Fine Arts Academy at Bryan Station High School was loosely structured, almost like a club, StationARTS requires an FCPS online application; letters of recommendation from an English, a math and a fine arts teacher; and an interview.
 
“We’re looking for that sparkle in their eye and asking them to show what they can do,” said Lyon, who emphasized the process is really more personal interaction than performance audition.
 
Ninth-grader Macy Smith, a veteran of Lexington Children’s Theatre, decided StationARTS would be a good way to explore her interest in drama. “You’ll get to learn more of how to act on stage and develop more (skills) so you can be a better actor outside school,” she said.
 
“The great thing about having a class like orchestra or drama on your schedule is it gives you a nice break in your school day to do something you’re passionate about,” added junior Caroline Copley, who has already built an impressive music resumé at Bryan Station.
 
StationARTS students are immersed in artistic experiences, from their daily courses to regular field trips. For instance, several busloads will go to see the University of Kentucky Opera Theatre’s production of Les Miserables at the Lexington Opera House in October. Students also work alongside professionals both in school and the local community. Ultimately, the fine arts will be integrated in all their classes.
 

   (Photo by Tammy L. Lane)

(Photo by Tammy L. Lane)

 
“I would love to see internships develop by the time they’re seniors,” Lyon said, looking toward the next four years.
 
StationARTS will offer a strong variety and a broad perspective that prepare students well for college. Jordan Durham, a senior, can attest to the foundation he has established through the school’s chorus, piano, guitar and band programs. He has also learned much about time management and seen doors open to potential music scholarships.
 
“I came here my sophomore year (from Paris) and when I found out what all was offered, I just blew up!” he said.
 
Jordan is also excited about the future for younger students in the revitalized StationARTS, proclaiming, “Other schools can step up their game, but we’ll always be first. We’re what’s happening! We’re going to be the pride of this city.”
 
Tammy L. Lane is a communications and media specialist for the Fayette County Public Schools.


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