A nonprofit publication of the Kentucky Center for Public Service Journalism

Kentucky Lottery revenues increase funding for need-based student aid programs by $15 million

A good year for the Kentucky Lottery means that the state’s students will be eligible for $15 million more in need-based college financial aid programs from the Kentucky Higher Education Assistance Authority (KHEAA). Gov. Andy Beshear announced the increase during his July 22 statewide briefing. “Due to higher lottery revenues, need-based student financial aid will receive another $15 million above...

Midway University releases new history book authored by President Emeritus Dr. Robert Botkin

Midway University has announced the release of the much-anticipated history book, “The Story of Midway University – How the Kentucky Female Orphan School Became Midway University.” The book, authored by President Emeritus Dr. Robert R. Botkin, covers the founding of the school and follows it through its many changes from a one building school for orphan girls to its modern day history as a fully,...

Lexington native Mirlen Hernandez awarded Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship

Mirlen Hernandez, a junior majoring in strategic communication and theatre at Morehead State University, was awarded the U.S. Department of State’s prestigious Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship. This grant program allows a student in need of financial support the opportunity to study and intern abroad. “I have never traveled out of state in the 21 years I’ve been alive,...

These birds don’t have wings, but they’re landing in Lexington and on the UK campus in August

By Lisa S. Cleveland University of Kentucky Bird e-scooters are landing at the University of Kentucky and in the City of Lexington in August. The electric scooter company will soon begin releasing its e-scooters at bike racks throughout campus. Bird was recently chosen as the university’s preferred e-scooter vendor, which means the company will deploy and rebalance e-scooters on campus to make them...

BRIGHT Leadership Kentucky class engages entrepreneurial minds from ARC counties

Leadership Kentucky is proud to announce the members of the BRIGHT Kentucky Class of 2020. BRIGHT Kentucky, which began in 2019, engages bright, entrepreneurial minds from various occupational sectors to offer non-partisan, ethical leadership training, expanded networks, and mentors designed especially for residents of the 54 Kentucky counties of the Appalachian Regional Commission (ARC). The program...

Take it from Dr. Jeff Foxx, this is no time to take your guard down on COVID-19; he speaks from experience

Jeff Foxx, MD, will be the first to tell you that COVID-19 almost killed him. After battling the disease for a month at Baptist Health Lexington, at times in a coma and on a ventilator, he is a survivor. Now he wants to share his story to encourage the community to continue taking safety precautions that can stem the spread of the virus. Dr. Jeff Foxx with his dog Daisy enjoy the outdoors at Jacobson...

Kentucky by Heart: In-person school is best, but we must have the resolve to do it safely and right

By Steve Flairty KyForward columnist From my perspective as a teacher, getting Kentucky’s elementary/secondary young people back into physical classrooms in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic is important and for many reasons. Obviously, students need to learn and grow mentally, physically, socially, and emotionally, and for most—a live classroom setting works best. And as any experienced teacher...

Reading matters: Books can make a big difference in a child’s life and school performance

By Jill Barshay The Hechinger Report Literacy experts have long known that reading to toddlers, even babies, can make a big difference in children’s reading abilities later in elementary school. But does simply giving away free books to low-income families with young children help with early reading? An analysis of 44 studies of book giveaway programs concludes that free stuff does work. Dolly Parton’s...

Billy Reed: Historic properties folks still haven’t said what statue will replace Davis; should be Ali

It was on June 11 when the Kentucky Historic Properties Advisory Commission voted 11-1 to remove the statue of Jefferson Davis, president of the Confederacy, from the Kentucky state capitol rotunda. (The lone vote against was Brandon T. Wilson who said the issue was being politicized and that he wasn’t there to remove history but to protect it.) The Commonwealth received much national and regional...

Reading the unreadable from 2,000 years ago: UK professor and team reveal Dead Sea Scroll text

By Lindsey Piercy University of Kentucky It’s a 25,000-piece puzzle that researchers have longed to solve. That’s because the 25,000 fragments represent the Dead Sea Scrolls, and inside are ancient secrets — mysteries that have been locked away for 2,000 years. For more than two decades, Brent Seales has doggedly labored to help solve the puzzle. Seales, professor and chair of the Department...

Tim Hanner, his own story: A second transplant, staying positive, embracing many lessons learned

Second of two parts Educator Tim Hanner shares his story in his own words — a story of the journey through discovering his kidney disease and two transplants, a journey of love and kindness and gratitude, a journey of friendships, family and faith, a journey of reflection, acceptance, and strength. And, when all is said and done, it’s the story of a life embraced and well-lived.The Reality...

Tim Hanner, his own story: Discovering surprising kidney disease — and dealing with the what’s next?

First of two parts Educator Tim Hanner shares his story in his own words — a story of the journey through discovering his kidney disease and two transplants, a journey of love and kindness and gratitude, a journey of friendships, family and faith, a journey of reflection, acceptance, and strength. And, when all is said and done, it’s the story of a life embraced and well-lived. My beginnings...

Quinn Chapel designated nationally significant for African American history, civil rights activism

In recognition of its role in African American history and civil rights activism, Chestnut Street Baptist/Quinn Chapel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Louisville has been designated nationally significant by the National Register of Historic Places, administered by the National Park Service. The church is located at 912 W. Chestnut Street, and the nomination focuses on the congregation’s...

Kentucky by Heart: Part two of a selection from coming children’s book; Joey and honey balls

Editor’s Note: This is the second of a two-part selection from Steve Flairty’s in-progress children’s book, tentatively titled Kentucky Billy and Other Stories of Character Virtue By Steve Flairty KyForward Columnist Monday morning, Mrs. Fielder stood in her empty classroom near her desk, finishing the coffee she had carried from the teachers’ lounge. After a restful weekend, she...

Kentucky-inspired independent film ‘The Mountain Minor’ to begin airing on KET this week

During the Great Depression, many Appalachian natives migrated to other parts of the country, desperate to find work. In the process, they brought with them the old-time mountain music that had been their primary source of entertainment, before phonographs and radio were widely available, especially in remote areas. The new independent film, “The Mountain Minor,” tells the story of one such family...

Food insecure in Kentucky? Not if UK Cooperative Extension has a say in battle against hunger

By Carol Lea Spence University of Kentucky As the COVID-19 pandemic swept through the state, sickening people, shuttering businesses, closing schools and temporarily crimping the food supply, a lot of people found themselves suddenly wondering how they would be able to feed their families. Without any warning, more Kentuckians than usual found themselves among the “food insecure.” To be food insecure...

Jamie’s Bookshelf: These recently-published nonfiction titles cover politics, media and more

•  “How to Read Nonfiction Like a Professor: A Smart, Irreverent Guide to Biography, History, Journalism, Blogs, and Everything in Between” by Thomas C. Foster (Harper, $27.99) is an interesting volume that attempts to teach us how to get accurate information in a rapidly changing 24/7 news cycle and become better readers, thinkers and consumers of media. The new 313-page hardcover is patterned...

Kentucky by Heart: A sneak-peek of coming children’s book starting with Joey and honey balls

Editor’s Note: This is the first of a two-part selection from Steve Flairty’s in-progress children’s book, tentatively titled Kentucky Billy and Other Stories of Character Virtue By Steve Flairty KyForward Columnist Joey’s eyes got bigger as his stash of honey balls grew in number, now seven. His classmates were big buyers today, he thought “Oh boy,” Joey whispered to himself...

UofL researchers test virtual COVID-19 care tool for veterans; automated texts reassure patients

By Baylee Pulliam University of Louisville Researchers at the University of Louisville are working with the Department of Veterans Affairs on a tool that texts COVID-19 information and advice straight to veterans’ phones. In a new study published in The Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association, UofL’s Jason Saleem and doctoral student Jacob Read found the tool, called Annie, gave...

Jamie’s Bookshelf: More cool nonfiction titles to add to your reading list as dog days of summer set in

• “Anxious for Nothing: Finding Calm in a Chaotic World” by Max Lucado (Thomas Nelson, $17.99) delivers a practical road map for battling with and healing from anxiety, depression and stress-related illnesses. The book is now in paperback. The inspirational author currently serves as teaching minister of Oak Hills Church in San Antonio, Texas. • “Every Drop of Blood: The Momentous Second...