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Mitch McConnell, Rand Paul touch on impeachment issue in speeches to Federalist Society in Frankfort


By Tom Latek
Kentucky Today

Both of Kentucky’s U.S. Senators weighed in on the impeachment inquiry involving President Donald Trump while in Frankfort Monday to speak to the Federalist Society.

Sen. Mitch McConnell, R-Louisville, wouldn’t talk to reporters after his speech but did make a brief comment on impeachment during his remarks to the group. “People think of it as a judicial-type proceeding, but it’s a political decision.”

U.S. Senators Rand Paul, left, and Mitch McConnell were in Frankfort on Monday. (Kentucky Today file photos)

Senator Rand Paul, R-Bowling Green, told reporters after his speech to the Federalist Society that one of the things they talked about was equal protection under the law, and referred to the telephone conversation the President had with the President of Ukraine.

“I think whether you’re a Republican or a Democrat, everybody should be treated equally. If you look at it objectively, have Republicans or Democrats threatened aid in the past if they don’t get what they want? Sounds like that’s what Joe Biden did, sounds like what four Democratic Senators did, and some accuse the President of the same thing.”

“If both sides are being accused of essentially interfering with aid, making it depend on who investigates what, sounds like we should treat both sides the same. It doesn’t sound like the impeachment of President Trump is one thing, yet I haven’t heard one Democrat say what Joe Biden did was wrong, to threaten their aid particularly over something where he is son was making $50,000 per month.”

Regarding the two whistleblowers who have come forward, Paul noted only a few people are privy to the President’s conversations. “It would be interesting to know if either one of the whistleblowers were legally allowed to, or did they get illegal dissemination of information? If the President can’t keep confidential some things and everybody is leaking it, that’s a real problem for our nation’s security as well.”

When asked by a reporter if it was wrong to ask Ukraine to investigate Joe Biden and his son Hunter, Paul replied, “Should aid be contingent on behavior? I would say yes. One of the things Ukraine has been accused of for a long time is corruption. So, should they investigate corruption, yeah. Whether asking about a specific individual is right or wrong, you can argue that maybe it wasn’t appropriate, but I don’t think there has been a real strong argument made that it was unlawful in any way.”

He added, “The guy that was paying Hunter Biden’s salary, the owner was an oligarch with billions of dollars that was being investigated about the origin of his money.”

Paul compared the oligarch system to the United States, saying there are a lot of differences, citing the founder of Wal-Mart as an example. “Sam Walton started out with a couple of stores and became a billionaire over the years selling stuff. Oligarchs became billionaires overnight, often by being handed a state monopoly which became a private monopoly. I think we should find out who was paying Hunter Biden $50,000 a month and why, and whether there was any corruption involved in that.”


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