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Optimistic outlook for breeders in Kentucky boosts Thoroughbred industry confidence


After the breeding slump that followed the downturn of the American economy in the last several years, EquiNews reports there is cautious optimism supported by numbers from 2012 and 2013. Some states have seen more breeding gains than others, but overall the outlook is positive.
 
Because Kentucky has traditionally been at the forefront of the Thoroughbred industry, growth in this state may boost confidence in other areas of North America. North American figures supplied by The Jockey Club showed that 2,392 stallions bred 37,908 Thoroughbred mares in 2012. By early September of 2013 when statistics were released, The Jockey Club estimated that the 2013 foal crop would total around 23,000. Kentucky stallions accounted for more than 40 percent of mares bred, and 48.8 percent of live foals were Kentucky-born.
 
Numbers of breeding mares and stallions used in 2012 were down overall from 2011. Among states where at least 1,000 mares were bred in 2012, only two—Florida and New York—had more stallions producing live foals in 2013 than in 2012. In 2013, three major breeding states—Kentucky, Oklahoma and Texas—showed stallions breeding more mares in 2013 than in 2012.
 
Pennsylvania, a state that briefly showed a large increase in Thoroughbred breeding, reported declining numbers of active mares and stallions in 2013, with 15 percent fewer mares and 28 percent fewer stallions used in 2013 compared to 2012. Ontario and California also saw significant declines in breeding numbers for 2013.
 
Statistics for the 2013 breeding season in Kentucky showed an upswing for the first time in more than five years. The number of mares bred increased by 334, and 11 additional stallions were used in 2013. These increases may not pull national numbers up significantly, but because Kentucky has traditionally been at the forefront of the Thoroughbred industry, strength in this state may boost confidence in other areas of North America.
 
From EquiNews


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