A nonprofit publication of the Kentucky Center for Public Service Journalism

Whayne Herriford: Establishing and maintaining boundaries in relationships is key to mental health

For many of my clients, one of the sources of both depression and anxiety is their ability to establish and maintain boundaries with other people. In therapy, boundaries are the limits or rules we set for ourselves and others in relationships. It’s based on our understanding of what we want or need in our lives and how we are willing to allow people to help us fulfill them. Boundaries often are...

With rates of depression rising in U.S., mental health experts say online screenings are an important tool

More Americans are using online screening tests to gauge whether depression is playing a role in their health, and mental health experts say that’s a good thing. Just as people might screen for diabetes, heart disease or high blood pressure, a depression screening provides a quick way to spot the first signs of what might be a serious mental health issue. Marcie Timmerman, executive director...

National awards program seeks Kentucky’s top youth volunteers; two honorees receive $1,000 scholarships

The Prudential Spirit of Community Awards is looking for Kentucky’s top youth volunteers of the year. Students in grades 5-12 are invited to apply for 2020 Prudential Spirit of Community Awards if they have made meaningful contributions to their communities through volunteer service within the past 12 months. The application is available at spirit.prudential.com and www.nassp.orgt. The Prudential...

Youths using e-cigarettes more likely to try marijuana; connection increased with refillable e-cig pods

By Melissa Patrick Kentucky Health News Young people who use electronic cigarettes are more likely to use marijuana, and the odds are even greater for those who start using e-cigarettes early, according to newly published research. The analysis of 21 separate studies, published in JAMA Pediatrics, found that the odds of marijuana use were 3½ times higher among youth who used electronic cigarettes,...

Rural Blog: Research links depression and suicide to chronic disease, especially for rural seniors

Research increasingly links depression and suicide to chronic disease, especially among seniors in rural U.S. “Rural America has some of the highest rates of chronic disease in the nation – the more remote a community, the more heart disease, cancer and diabetes. And there’s a side effect from having a chronic condition many people don’t think about – depression, anxiety and even suicide,”...

Kentucky ranks 49th in mental health for those 60 and older in Latest America’s Health Rankings Report

By Nadia Ramlagan Public News Service More older Kentuckians are struggling with mental-health issues. The latest America’s Health Rankings Report found Kentucky is one of the states where high numbers of people age 60 and older report experiencing depression, frequent mental distress and social isolation. The U.S. Census Bureau estimates that 24.8 percent of Kentucky’s population will...

Constance Alexander: The semicolon is a valuable writing tool, that could some day save a life

“The great thing about the semicolon,” I tell my students, “is that it can make your writing look more sophisticated, and forge longer sentences that are flowing, not choppy.” But what I like best about semicolons is how Amy Bleuel transformed the symbol into a badge of hope. Thanks to her, the punctuation mark is a way to honor those who struggle with depression, suicide addiction, anxiety,...

Half of state adults know someone who is depressed, 30 percent don’t know where to call for treatment

By Melissa Patrick Kentucky Health News Nearly half of Kentucky adults know someone who has a serious problem with depression, and most say they know who to contact for treatment, according to the latest Kentucky Health Issues Poll. “Depression is common in Kentucky, as it is elsewhere in the country, and it’s important to understand that it is a serious mood disorder that can and should...

SmartHealthToday: World Health Organization focuses on preventing and treating depression

By Shelly Reese SmartHealthToday Because depression is ubiquitous, debilitating and – at its worst – deadly, the World Health Organization is engaging in a year-long campaign focused on educating people about depression and how to seek help for the condition. Depression is an illness that can happen to anybody. The mental anguish it causes can profoundly impair a person’s ability to carry out...

Understanding the illness, getting treatment is the key for those experiencing depression

Dr. Teresa Gevedon Special to KyForward Depression is an illness affecting about 16 million people in the United States each year. While effective treatments are available, unfortunately, the stigma of being seen as weak, inadequate or broken prevents many from seeking care. Family and friends of those experiencing depression can help reduce that stigma by understanding the illness and supporting...

SmartHealthToday: Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) is real; sometimes light therapy is called for

By Matt Koesters SmartHealthToday Shorter days and grayer skies could leave you feeling blue. If you’re caught up in a rut that comes and goes with the winter season, you might be affected by Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD). SAD, sometimes referred to as seasonal depression, is a type of depression linked to the changing of the seasons. While it’s usually associated with the onset of winter weather,...

Mike Farrell: No matter how hard we try, suicide is beyond understanding, explanation

They were just two lines in the New York Times online: The Marin County sheriff’s office said in a statement that it “suspects the death to be a suicide due to asphyxia.” An investigation was under way. Robin Williams, who made us laugh for more than three decades, apparently drowned in his own depression. It is beyond understanding, and it is certainly beyond explanation.   Robin Williams The...

Another ‘Kentucky ugly’ – depression – less cited but equally serious; subject of UK study

Claire Snell-Rood, front left, pictured with UK faculty and staff working to address health disparities in Appalachia. From left are Beth Bowling, Dr. Patrick Kitzman, Dr. Nancy Schoenberg, Dr. Fran Feltner, Dr. Jane Lowe, Dr. Tina Studts, Dr. Claire Snell-Rood, and Dr. Philip Kern. (Photo from UKNow)   By Mallory Powell Special to KyForward   From the New York Times to visits from the director...

Wellness Matters: Hanging on to negative thoughts? Don’t, try mindfulness instead

By Jan Carden KyForward columnist   We all struggle with negative thinking – negative thinking about our work, our bodies, our financial situation, other people, the meal we just ate, politics, the future, something someone said to us, events in the past.   It’s seemingly endless.   But it’s not surprising. We are hardwired to track and to hold onto negative information...