A nonprofit publication of the Kentucky Center for Public Service Journalism

Kentuckians pledge to strengthen communities through Americorps during swearing-in ceremony

Hundreds of AmeriCorps volunteers pledged to make Kentucky “Safer, Smarter and Healthier,” during a swearing-in ceremony at Fourth Street Live! in Louisville on Monday. AmeriCorps is a national service program administered by Serve Kentucky, an agency within the Cabinet for Health and Family Services (CHFS), with funding provided by the federal Corporation for National and Community Service (CNCS)...

Allstate agents offer financial education classes to Kentucky domestic violence survivors

By Nadia Ramlagan Public News Service Allstate insurance agents are helping domestic violence survivors with financial literacy by teaching financial education classes at shelters across the Commonwealth. Kimberlie Rigsby is an Allstate agent in Brown County who also is a domestic violence survivor. She teaches women the basics of budgeting, bank accounts and credit scores. Rigsby says many people...

Pew Trusts: It’s hard to manage your credit when you’ve never been taught about ‘interest’

By Marsha Mercer Pew Trusts When Kentucky state Treasurer Allison Ball and a colleague talked with high school seniors last year about credit cards and other pieces of the personal finance puzzle, something wasn’t right. “We kept using the word ‘interest’ and we kept getting blank stares,” Ball recalled. Finally, she asked the students who knew what interest is. No one did. “Here they...

A look at some of the new laws passed during the Kentucky General Assembly 2018 regular session

The Kentucky General Assembly’s 2018 regular session ended Saturday evening, capping off a session in which lawmakers approved the state’s next two-year budget and numerous other measures that will affect people throughout the state. Most new laws – those that come from legislation that don’t contain emergency clauses or different specified effective dates – will go into effect in mid-July. A...

KHEAA encourages students to learn difference between needs, wants to grow bank accounts

One of the biggest steps to financial security is learning the difference between a need and a want, according to the Kentucky Higher Education Assistance Authority (KHEAA). Students who have learned that difference will find that their bank accounts grow more quickly. Needs include clothes, food and, for many students, transportation. With clothes, a want may mean wearing only designer items that...

Gena Bigler: Kentuckians need financial literacy; House Bill 223 can provide it

Nearly 70 percent of Americans are in debt. The average American family has over $7,000 in credit card debt and a recent study by the Brookings Institute found that 21 percent of Americans and 38 percent of those with incomes under $25,000 thought that winning the lottery was the most practical strategy for gathering money for retirement. Americans need financial literacy programs.   Kentuckians...

Gena Bigler: If England, Tennessee can make kids financially literate, so should Kentucky

Financial literacy just made a huge leap in the UK. By 2014, personal finance education will be mandatory in schools there. Here in the US, curriculum requirements are largely set at the state and local level. A few states require a personal finance class in high school. Virginia, Missouri, Utah and our neighbor Tennessee all require a stand alone class.   The need for financial literacy is well...