A nonprofit publication of the Kentucky Center for Public Service Journalism

Boys’ suicides increased after release of ’13 Reasons Why’; third season prompts warnings for all families

By Melissa Patrick Kentucky Health News The rate of suicide among 10- to 17-year-olds in the U.S. increased 29% in the months after the Netflix show “13 Reasons Why” was first telecast in March 2017, according to a federal study. Statistically, boys were responsible for the increase. The rate for girls increased, but the rise was not statistically significant, said a news release from...

A historic grant: UK gets four-year $87 million grant to lead HEALing Communities project on opioids

By Kristi Willett University of Kentucky In the largest grant ever awarded to the University of Kentucky, researchers from UK’s Center on Drug and Alcohol Research (CDAR) and across campus — in partnership with the Kentucky Cabinet for Health and Family Services and the Justice and Public Safety Cabinet (JPSC) — will lead a project as part of the HEALing Communities study. The four-year,...

Low-income, rural kids may be at higher risk of secondhand cigarette smoke exposure

A newly published study in Nicotine & Tobacco Research found that young children from low-income, rural homes could be at a higher risk of exposure to second- and thirdhand cigarette smoke than previously reported. Secondhand smoke is smoke in the air that comes from a lit tobacco product; thirdhand smoke is smoke residue that settles into floors, furniture and clothing. The study, funded by...

Keven Moore: Home DNA kits have become a hot item; know the ins and outs before you order

In theory, you could be discriminated against for health or for racist reasons. In theory. DNA is a double helix formed by base pairs attached to a sugar-phosphate backbone. Source: National Institutes for Health This will probably be a more real issue in the future, but right now, the data, algorithms, and accessibility aren’t there. Voluntary records from familial DNA searching sites can be used...

UK reseachers developing computer software to deliver better therapies for heart failure patients

By Whitney Harder Special to KyFoward Picture this: you’re battling heart failure and meeting with your doctor to discuss treatment. Before prescribing anything, the doctor pulls up a virtual model of your heart on her computer and “treats” it with several drugs. A few moments later, she can see how your heart is doing five years down the road. Your doctor chooses the treatment with...

University of Kentucky awarded $11.2 million grant to launch new Center for Cancer and Metabolism

The University of Kentucky was recently awarded a prestigious Centers of Biomedical Research Excellence (COBRE) grant to study the metabolism of cancer from the National Institutes of General Medical Sciences, part of the National Institutes of Health. The $11.2 million grant, announced by school officials Monday, will fund UK’s Center for Cancer and Metabolism over the next five years. Kentucky...

Getting people screened still most critical part of puzzle in Appalachia’s battle against cancer

Leaders of the National Institutes of Health spent several days last week in Hazard with Fifth District U.S. Rep. Harold “Hal” Rogers and local health leaders to examine efforts to combat high rates of cancer and substance abuse in Appalachian Kentucky. “Cancer rates in the region have been something we have been battling for many years and in more recent years this region has become...

Study says fast food contains industrial chemicals linked to health problems such as infertility, diabetes

People who eat a lot of fast food have higher levels of chemicals that “have been linked to a number of adverse health outcomes, including higher rates of infertility,” especially among men, Roberto Ferdman reports for The Washington Post. Researchers at George Washington University in Washington, D.C., say the connection could have “great public health significance,” Ferdman...

When you eat could have as much impact on your health as what you eat, researchers say

  Dr. Vincent Cassone talks about his biology research.   By Allison Elliott-Shannon Special to KyForward   Researchers funded by a National Institutes of Health grant have concluded that when you eat could have as much impact on your health as what you eat.   Vincent Cassone, University of Kentucky College of Arts and Sciences professor and chair of the Department of Biology,...