A nonprofit publication of the Kentucky Center for Public Service Journalism

AAA: Kentucky sees second-largest drop in gas prices in nation; demand plummets to 12-week low

As demand dropped for a second week, so did gasoline supply levels – down nearly 3 million barrels to 231 million barrels. Despite consistently decreasing week-over-week, supplies remain at a 3 million barrels year-over-year surplus. “Typically lower supply levels translate into higher pump prices. However, even with consistent declines in gasoline stocks, that’s just not the case right now,”...

Kentucky sees third-largest drop in gas prices nationally in past week; low prices here to stay

Motorists saw plenty of savings at the pump from Memorial Day through Labor Day. The national gas price average during the unofficial start and stop to summer was $2.15 ― the cheapest since 2004. Demand was decimated this summer, which ultimately meant increased supply and cheap gas prices. That trend continues. In its latest report, the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reported that demand...

AAA: Gasoline prices remain mostly steady, despite demand at highest level in four nearly months

Gasoline demand increased on the week to the highest level (8.7 million barrels per day) since March as stocks decreased, but the combination still wasn’t enough to significantly impact gas price averages in Kentucky or across the country. On the week, the national gas price average only increased a couple of pennies to land at $2.20. That is 10 cents more than last month and nearly 60 cents less...

Kentucky sees largest jump at pump in the nation; significant increase in gas demand last week

Demand for gasoline across the the country is signaling that Americans are filling up more, according to AAA. For Kentuckians, that’s also meant higher prices at the pump. In the past week, the average gas price for unleaded in Kentucky has jumped 9 cents to land at $2.10. That’s the biggest leap of any state in the nation, week over week. It also lands Kentucky the number five spot on the leaderboard...

Kim Buckler Hydes: Tourism is an investment in economic recovery, both nationally and in Kentucky

Tourism was hit first and hit hardest by the economic impact of the coronavirus. Travel industry losses will exceed any other sector. Nationally, they are expected to be nine times the losses after 9/11, with a total economic damage of more than $1.2 trillion. That also translates into more than $50 billion in reduced tax revenue. In Kentucky, 75 percent of workers in our industry were laid off or...