A nonprofit publication of the Kentucky Center for Public Service Journalism

Citrus Bowl-bound Wildcats head to 3rd straight postseason game under Stoops on New Year’s Day

By Keith Taylor Kentucky Today Kentucky will be in the spotlight on New Year’s Day and the extra attention will be motivation for the Wildcats when they take on Penn State in the Citrus Bowl. Coach Mark Stoops watches team practice in Orlando. (UK Athletics photo) “I think as you move up and play in New Year’s Day bowl game, and play Penn State, it’s definitely motivation,”...

Jamie Vaught: UK football climbs near Top 10 in national poll, has favorable remaining schedule

After Kentucky’s ugly 14-7 win over Vanderbilt in an important SEC matchup last Saturday night, the football Wildcats, as you know, are riding high with a 6-1 overall mark with five games remaining. And they are tied for first place in the SEC Eastern Division race, sharing the same spot with Florida and Georgia. The Big Blue Nation is pretty excited about the rising Wildcats even though the team...

Beth Underwood: Though I despise whining, I really hate the cold more — so please let me vent

“I’m not yelling at you, I’m yelling to you,” I said to Colton. It was New Year’s Day, and the two of us were headed to my parents to ring it in with the traditional chocolate fondue. At this point in the holiday season, we’d all eaten enough chocolate/sugar/junk food to re-sink the Titanic, so what’s one more day, right? Except I really wasn’t in the mood. In fact, I had no desire...

Old Time Kentucky: For good fortune in the New Year, better eat your black-eyed peas

By Berry Craig KyForward columnist More than a few Kentuckians will ring in the New Year with a down-home feast of black-eyed peas, accompanied by cabbage and cornbread. The old Southern custom supposedly brings good fortune to those who observe it. 
 Black-eyed peas are seasoned with smoked pork, traditionally a ham hock or hog jowl. My mother usually substituted a bacon slice or a tablespoonful...

Old Time Kentucky: Remembering when state revelers welcomed the New Year by anvil firing

By Berry Craig KyForward columnist More than a few of our Kentucky forebears who sang “Silent Night” didn’t practice what they crooned. They noisily welcomed Christmas by shooting fireworks and firearms. But the biggest booms came from anvil-firing. Kentuckians forsook the custom long ago, possibly because it sometimes claimed lives and limbs. Even so, blasting anvils was popular from Paducah...