A nonprofit publication of the Kentucky Center for Public Service Journalism

Constance Alexander: Exploring the power of Alzheimer’s through metaphor and medicine

The official description is bleak: Alzheimer’s is a progressive disorder that causes brain cells to waste away and die. But Eugenia Zuckerman, who has been diagnosed with the disorder, sees it another way. In her memoir about coping with the dreaded condition, she compares the experience to falling through a cloud. Internationally known as a flutist and a writer, Ms. Zuckerman is also known to...

Constance Alexander: What happens when a loved one in need of assistance is refusing help?

Caregiving, like getting old, is not for the faint of heart, which is why those who provide care for loved ones with Alzheimer’s appreciate convenient access to useful information. Via its interactive telemedicine system, University of Kentucky’s Sanders-Brown Center on Aging reaches across the commonwealth to act as a resource for caregivers and the hundreds of thousands of people in Kentucky...

Sanders-Brown Markesbery Symposium focuses on why some people don’t get Alzheimer’s or dementia

By Laura Dawahare and Allison Perry Special to KyForward Why do some people stay intellectually sharp into their 90s, while others have memory problems? Is there anything we can learn from their lifestyles that can help everyone age successfully? These are among topics scheduled for the University of Kentucky Sanders-Brown Center on Aging’s Markesbery Symposium on Nov. 3-4. Keynote speakers...

Tips for caring for yourself while providing care for someone else — don’t ignore your needs

By Robin Hamon Special to KyForward Caring for someone with dementia can be exhausting but many caregivers ignore their own needs in order to care for others — at the expense of their own health and welfare. You might think you have too much on your plate or feel guilty about doing anything for yourself when someone else desperately needs you. But you can be a more effective caregiver when you carve...

UK Sanders-Brown Center on Aging receives $8.25 million to continue Alzheimer’s research

By Laura Dawahare Special to KyForward The University of Kentucky Sanders-Brown Center on Aging Alzheimer’s Disease Center (ADC) has been awarded an $8.25 million, five-year grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to continue and further research and clinical initiatives geared toward treating Alzheimer’s disease. Currently, only 30 designated Alzheimer’s Disease Centers...

UK Visual Arts study provides participants with dementia with a ‘gift for life’

By Whitney Hale Special to KyForward “This is the greatest gift you ever gave me.” Those are the very touching words of just one of several changed patients who participated in the University of Kentucky’s first visual arts study for patients with dementia held last spring at the School of Art and Visual Studies. The comment, shared with his spouse and caregiver, was all the confirmation...

Know someone 100 years old or older? Nominate them for UK’s Center on Aging Centenarian Awards

Nominations are now being accepted for the University of Kentucky Sanders-Brown Center on Aging Centenarian Awards. Those nominated for the Sanders-Brown Centenarian Award must be age 100 or older within the 2016 calendar year and must live in Kentucky. Those nominated for the Sanders-Brown Centenarian Award must be age 100 or older within the 2016 calendar year and must live in Kentucky (UK Now Photo) Centenarians...

What to look for at family gatherings: Is elderly loved one just forgetful or is it something more serious?

The holidays are a time when families get together ̶ sometimes after long periods apart. “If you haven’t seen your elderly loved one in a while, you might be more likely to notice changes in their memory and behavior that worries you,” said Dr. Gregory Jicha of the University of Kentucky Sanders-Brown Center on Aging. Look for these early signs of dementia in an elderly loved one: ·...

Glen Campbell’s physician to speak at UK’s annual Markesbery Symposium on Aging and Dementia

By Laura Dawaher Special to KyForward Many people think there’s never been a darker time for Alzheimer’s disease. There’s no cure, they point out. The field is littered with treatment failures; the last time the FDA approved a drug to treat the symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease was 2003. Dr. Ronald Petersen is adamant that this is wrong-headed thinking. “We learn even in...

What can beagles teach us about Alzheimer’s disease? A lot, says Sanders-Brown researcher

Researcher Elizabeth Head of the UK Sanders-Brown Center on Aging said, ‘If we can find ways to improve brain health in old dogs, there’s hope that these approaches can translate to healthy aging in people as well.’ (Photo provided)   A commentary by Elizabeth Head of the University of Kentucky Sanders-Brown Center on Aging was recently featured on the website, “The Conversation,”...

Sanders-Brown will test drug with potential
to prevent Alzheimer’s; participants sought

Trial candidates will undergo a series of tests to determine their eligibility, including an imaging test called a PET scan to determine whether they have evidence of amyloid plaque buildup.   The University of Kentucky’s Sanders-Brown Center on Aging is participating in a landmark multicenter clinical trial of an experimental drug that has the potential to prevent Alzheimer’s disease.   The...

Tickling the Ivories: Older adults learning
the benefits of recreational music making

By Jenny Wells and Whitney Hale Special to KyForward     A group of adults over the age of 50 at the University of Kentucky are learning ways to enhance their personal relationships and relieve anxiety all while advancing their skills on the piano. Through the new recreational outreach music making program mUsiKcare, UK School of Music faculty aim to enhance student training, wellness and...

Speaking second language shows benefits
to the aging brain, new UK study shows

(Photo from UKNow) Older adults who have spoken two languages since childhood are faster than single-language speakers at switching from one task to another, according to a study conducted at the University of Kentucky College of Medicine.   The study also found that lifelong bilinguals show different patterns of brain activity than their monolingual counterparts when making the switch.   The...