A nonprofit publication of the Kentucky Center for Public Service Journalism

Constance Alexander: Teaching the history of our country is hard enough, but living it is even harder

Schools are not adequately teaching the history of American slavery, educators are not sufficiently prepared to teach it, textbooks do not have enough material about it, and – as a result – students lack a basic knowledge of the important role it played in shaping the United States and the impact it continues to have on race relations in America. Even as I consider how I learned history, with many...

Catrena Bowman-Thomas: It’s Juneteenth; celebrate end of slavery and pursue meaningful ‘what’s next’

Today is Juneteenth! A holiday recognized by the state of Kentucky and many other states, Juneteenth is the oldest nationally celebrated commemoration of the ending of slavery in the United States. Dating back to 1865, it was on June 19th that the Union soldiers, led by Major General Gordon Granger, landed at Galveston, Texas with news that the war had ended and that the enslaved were now free. Note...

Old Time Kentucky: Lincoln, a hero to legions, was largely unloved in his native Bluegrass State

By Berry Craig KyForward columnist No son of Kentucky is more famous or more revered than Abraham Lincoln, and rightly so. His 1809 birthplace near Hodgenville, the LaRue County seat, is a national shrine. Lincoln’s statue stands tall in the Capitol rotunda in Frankfort. Yet no president was more unpopular in Kentucky than the Great Emancipator, who got less than one percent of the Bluegrass State’s...

Lincoln and the 13th amendment subject of panel discussion at Kentucky State University Thursday

Kentucky State University will host “The Spring Colloquium: On the 150th Anniversary of the 13th Amendment” from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. on Thursday, April 21, at Hathaway Hall 123. The event is free and open to the public. The event will feature excerpts from the Steven Spielberg film, “Lincoln” followed by a panel discussion featuring KSU associate professors Dr. Cynthia Shelton, Dr. Elgie...

Robert Treadway: Kentucky’s James Bond paved way for blacks to get an education

James Bond is a seminal figure in the American Civil Rights Movement. No, not that James Bond. Kentucky’s James Bond was not a spy, nor a movie star; however, he was one of the most important figures in the early civil rights history of Kentucky.   Kentucky's James Bond (Photo from Kentucky Civil Rights Commission) Born a slave during the Civil War near Lawrenceburg, Bond’s desire for...