A nonprofit publication of the Kentucky Center for Public Service Journalism

Billy Reed: Still reeling from mob at Capitol and thinking of those who make a difference

Here at the start, I must admit that I am still reeling at what I saw happen Wednesday afternoon in our nation’s Capitol building. I will never get over the sight of Americans fighting other Americans for control of our revered temple of freedom. It was sad beyond belief. But it also renewed my resolve to use any forum I have to speak to my fellow Americans, especially the young people, about the...

Col Owens: Pursuit of more perfect union includes solving problem of social, economic inequalities

Justice is at the forefront of public debate today. Poverty and race issues clamor for attention and resolution. It is an appropriate time to think about bold policy options, including reparations for longstanding racial injustice. What is justice? In A Theory of Justice (1971), John Rawls says justice involves a “principled reconciliation f liberty and equality.” Every person must have the equal...

Col Owens: Teaching is an investment in the future and that’s why I’m teaching poverty law

I returned to teaching a couple of weeks ago. I teach a course in Poverty Law at NKU’s Chase Law College as an adjunct professor. Many people ask me what poverty law is. I answer that it’s the study of how the law impacts and intersects with poor people – for better or worse. It happens in virtually every area of life – housing, health, employment, public benefits, family, education,...

UK graduate Cameo Kendrick elected NEA-Aspiring Educators chair to lead 40,000-member group

The National Education Association’s Aspiring Educators elected a new leader, Cameo Kendrick of Lexington, at its annual conference, which took place just prior to NEA’s Annual Meeting & Representative Assembly. A graduate of the University of Kentucky, Kendrick completed her degree in middle school English and social studies. During her two-year term as chair, Kendrick will work full-time...

UK marketing experts explain how, why brands are tackling current social justice issues

By Lindsey Piercy University of Kentucky Ben & Jerry’s. Nike. Patagonia. These are just a few of the major brands and companies taking a firm stance against racial injustice and demonstrating their support for the Black Lives Matter movement. In the wake of protests across the United States, corporate America is shifting away from “business-as-usual” and instead, sharing messages of solidarity...

Kentucky Arts Council awards more than $1.2 million in operating support to nonprofit arts groups

The Kentucky Arts Council has awarded more than $1.2 million in operating support to 93 arts organizations across the Commonwealth for the 2020 fiscal year through its Kentucky Arts Partnership (KAP) program. The KAP program provides nonprofit arts organizations with unrestricted operating support to ensure that year-round participation in the arts is available to the people of Kentucky. “The Kentucky...

Austin Griffiths: March is Social Work Month, an annual opportunity to spotlight those helping others

It’s finally March in Kentucky, and we all know what that means. Nope, sorry, we’re not talking about basketball. March is Social Work Month—an annual opportunity to spotlight those who are dedicated to helping others to reach their full potential. The theme in 2019 “Elevate Social Work” is an appropriate way to recognize this honorable profession. Social work is often portrayed inaccurately...

Mike Farrell: Kaepernick’s motives for taking-a-knee have been lost; find them — and find solutions too

Colin Kaepernick’s message has been overshadowed by storms of protest, by social media blasts back and forth and now by an advertising campaign by one of America’s commercial giants. Could we rewind the tape to the 2016 NFL preseason? The then-San Francisco quarterback took a knee during the pregame National Anthem. Others around the league soon joined him. Kaepernick said it was a protest against...

Everyday Heroes: Fighting for the poor, protecting the land is life’s work for priest

By Steve Flairty KyForward columnist   This story is taken from Steve Flairty’s 2008 book, Kentucky’s Everyday Heroes. Since the story was written, Father John Rausch has continued to work on issues of social justice, including the mining practice of mountaintop removal, and shared messages aimed at uplifting the people and land of Eastern Kentucky. He will retire in September as director...