A nonprofit publication of the Kentucky Center for Public Service Journalism

A pioneer in remote learning, Sullivan University launching online summer quarter on June 29

As the COVID-19 virus forces campuses to close, many colleges and universities are scrambling to offer online classes. At Sullivan University, it is business as usual. For more than 20 years, Sullivan has been pioneer, innovator and leader in online education, driven by a keen understanding that not everyone’s life fits into an average college schedule. “Our programs feed into the careers that...

Sullivan University’s Chris Ernst elected president of Ky. Association of Career Colleges and Schools

Chris Ernst, Senior Vice President for Administration at Sullivan University, has been elected president of the Kentucky Association of Career Colleges and Schools (KACCS). Ernst, a Louisville native and Sullivan University graduate, officially began his tenure as president during the Aug. 9 KACCS annual conference, which was held at Sullivan University in Louisville. He follows past presidents Cindy...

Trace Chesser appointed president and CEO of Louisville-based national nonprofit USA Cares

USA Cares, a national nonprofit organization supporting military families in crisis, has announced that Trace Chesser will serve as the organization’s official President/CEO, effective immediately. Chesser has served as USA Cares’ Interim President/CEO since May, following a change in leadership at the organization. The announcement introducing Chesser’s new title was made during the annual USA...

Kentucky’s Harlan County High School is runner-up in Regional Junior Chef Competition

North Carolina edged out Kentucky on Friday – not on the basketball court, but in the kitchen. Apex High School of North Carolina prevailed in the second annual Southeast Region Junior Chef Competition at Sullivan University in Louisville. Kentucky champion Harlan County High School was the runner-up among the state champion high school culinary teams from six states. “These teams are what Junior...

Bluegrass Tomorrow presents IdeaFestival day for juniors; Astronaut Story Musgrave to speak

Famed NASA Astronaut Story Musgrave, who holds one of his several graduate degrees from the University of Kentucky, returns to Lexington to headline IdeaFestival (IF) Student Day on April 16 for nearly 1,000 Fayette County Public School juniors. Presented by Bluegrass Tomorrow’s Bluegrass Higher Education Consortium, the program is designed for students to focus on the next step into their...

For-profit college settlement with CEC to eliminate $2.3 Million in debt for more than 1,300 Kentuckians

Attorney General Andy Beshear announced Monday that for-profit education company Career Education Corp. or CEC has agreed to reform its recruiting and enrollment practices. It also agreed to forgo collecting more than $2.3 million in debts owed by more than 1,300 Kentucky students. The announcement is part of a $498 million national settlement with the Illinois-based CEC and state attorneys general...

Chef John Foster: Ginger is more useful than you think — from gingerbread to syrups, soups to sauces

Did you know that Queen Elizabeth the first was the genesis of the gingerbread man? She commissioned that little “cakes” flavored with a heavy dose of ginger were to be made in the likeness of her familiars, (probably not to scale). This is one of the many fascinating facts that I found in my research about ginger, which included the cloudy origins, the many imposters, and the ongoing English...

Chef John Foster: Chestnuts roasting on an open fire — but can you figure how to make them taste good

I’ve always been a curious person, probably what makes it easy for me to be a cook. I’m always asking questions. The simple ones range from how it tastes, to what would I use this for? The tougher ones are about background and heritage, searching through my own family history or some obscure recipe book from the 1940s. Recently, in one of those journeys, I came across the classic Christmas carol...

Chef John Foster: Use the apple, of course, but take a moment to consider the pear, the forgotten fall fruit

The mention of fall and winter fruit conjures images of apples, pumpkins and cranberries. Fruit vibrant in both color and flavor, and well suited to the dishes that provide warmth and comfort at a family get-together or a chilly night at home. Of the three, apples are probably the most utilized during these seasons, not only for their flavor and texture but their versatility as well. Spanning the...

Chef Foster: Finals approach and nerves and dread, but as professionals every day is a ‘finals’ day

Talk about stress, culinary finals are upon us beginning today through next week. The reality for some of my students is that they’re finishing their programs and moving into their externships. For others, it’s the next step to the next quarter. For all students, it should be the culmination of nine weeks of hard work, and hopefully the validation of the quality of their work. There are many...

Chef John Foster: Holidays are hectic, make it easier on yourself by using leftovers wisely (eat well too)

Pay no attention to the hype surrounding the holidays, turn your phone off, light the holiday candles, and curl up with a warm bowl of soup and a good book. That used to be the way to decompress, but with 24-hour access, the need and the urge to interact is incredibly strong. Beginning even before Thanksgiving, and extending through January 1, there is very little downtime. Short of hibernation,...

Chef John Foster: Holidays are coming, holidays are coming! No one’s really ready, so keep it simple

The holidays are coming fast and furious for the next month and a half, and I’m not ready. I like that I’m not ready because it adds an element of suspense to the next few weeks, but it does wreak havoc at home. We’re heading north for Thanksgiving, back to New York to see my wife’s parents and some of my family as well. We’ve offered to cook Thanksgiving dinner, which puts even more pressure...

Chef John Foster: As empty nesters, eating habits change — more veggies, more variety, eating out

At last, peace in the house. Both boys gone to make their way in the world, leaving us (without counting 1 dog and 5 cats) empty nesters. That word evokes such images, propels thoughts to places best reserved for later in life. But it does impact what, and how we eat even to the point of changing the dynamic of our pantry and refrigerator. Having two young men over 6’ 3” and closing in on 200...

Chef John Foster: So you want to be a professional cook — and then comes the culinary midterms

Culinary midterms arrived this week, darkening the mood of the students, just in time for Halloween. To say that some of my students were not prepared is an understatement and should rightfully be attributed to my lack of delivering a real-world wake-up call these first few weeks of class. We tend to ease them into each quarter whether it’s their first or their last, which for an Advanced Techniques...

Chef John Foster: Don’t just wonder about the strange things you see at the market, try them

Ever wonder about some of the strange things you see at the market? The odd little basket of this or that that never fills a table, because very few people will even know what it is much less purchase it. The colors are different, the shape is strange, sometimes the smell drives people away. Your farmer will know what it is, may even attach some sentimental value to it. They won’t grow it to feel...

Quarles proclaims October Farm to School Month to promote local foods for Kentucky students

Serving local foods in Kentucky schools benefits the entire community, Agriculture Commissioner Ryan Quarles said in proclaiming October as Farm to School Month in Kentucky. Quarles “Eating healthy local foods helps Kentucky kids do their best,” Commissioner Quarles said. “At the same time, when schools buy local, farmers and food businesses increase their sales, and that boosts the local economy....

Chef John Foster: Life moves on with change of seasons and so come chilies, stews, and roasts

And just like that the gateway to the summer slams shut. No, it goes out not with a whimper but in a deluge of rain and dark clouds, spiraling from 60-degree weather and falling leaves to 85 and mosquitoes. Keeneland waits at the end of the week, and beyond that, there is already talk of Black Friday and the new year ahead. It all seems to change without our even noticing. Just a few weeks ago I...

Chef John Foster: Cooking is art and will always need a human touch, despite advent of cooking robots

I just finished reading an article about robots making food and I must confess that I’m a bit freaked out. I like the idea of consistency as much as the next chef or restaurateur but the thought of gleaming, sleek machines pumping out food at an accelerated rate with very little human involvement blurs the lines of the creative process. Someone has to set the concept, something could do the heavy...

Chef John Foster: Having two jobs (teaching, owning a restaurant) means work is always on the mind

As I write this, Sullivan University is on break. I find myself at a loss for what to do as my work often dictates what I do with myself when I’m on break. I know I’ll be at work in the restaurant tonight, but what to do with the rest of my day? The answer is complex, and multilayered, nothing as simple as lying in bed until noon eating bonbons (not that I ever did that!). And yes, the answer...

Chef John Foster: Late summer, early fall offer the perfect opportunity to kick up the heat in the kitchen

Hard to remember that a few weeks ago I was writing about cooler weather and the change of seasons. It’s hot and steamy, and not much fun to eat and cook in. The bugs have been much worse than in the past so grilling out has become a test of our willpower versus theirs. We’re a little late for gazpacho. Chilled melon soup has run its course. You can still get watermelon, and cantaloupe, but less...