A publication of the Kentucky Center for Public Service Journalism

Supreme Court highlights need for attorney volunteers, declares Oct. 21-27 Ky. Pro Bono Week

The Supreme Court wants to thank Kentucky attorneys who donate their time and expertise by proclaiming Oct. 21-27 as Kentucky Pro Bono Week. “One of the hallmarks of legal professionalism is a commitment to public service,” said Chief Justice of Kentucky John D. Minton Jr. “Although Kentucky doesn’t have a pro bono requirement, Rule 6.1 of the Rules of Professional Conduct encourages all lawyers...

Jeff Hoover: Mitch McConnell cements legacy with Supreme Court confirmations; bold action prevailed

It wasn’t long ago in our nation that boxing was one of the preeminent sports. Like almost everyone near my age, I grew up watching some of the greats like George Foreman, Joe Frazier and Larry Holmes. Of course, none was greater than Kentucky’s own Muhammad Ali.   For nearly 20 years, Ali was the undisputed heavyweight champion of the world. He took on fighters younger and older than him, bigger...

Bill Straub: Taking bets on McConnell’s choice of doing what’s best for (1) the nation or (2) his party?

WASHINGTON – Senate Republican Leader Mitch “Root-‘n-Branch’’ McConnell is facing a dilemma. McConnell, of Louisville, has, on numerous occasions, been justifiably criticized for placing the priorities of his Republican Party ahead of the nation’s welfare. It was, after all, ol’ Root-‘n-Branch who vowed rigid non-cooperation with anything President Barack Obama, a Democrat and the...

Supreme Court to hear oral arguments in employee pension case at 10 a.m. Thurs.; here’s how to watch

There will be several ways for the public to view oral arguments when the Supreme Court of Kentucky hears the state employee pension case at 10 a.m. ET Thursday, Sept. 20. The case is Matthew G. Bevin, In His Official Capacity As Governor Of The Commonwealth Of Kentucky, Et Al. V. Commonwealth of Kentucky Ex Rel. Andy Beshear, Attorney General, Et Al.

 Supreme Court Justices Due to interest in...

Bill Straub: It take a certain talent to spew gibberish on a consistent basis, and McConnell has talent

Looks can, indeed be deceiving. Take Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell, for example. McConnell, of Louisville, comes across as your dull, standard issue white-man-in-a-suit with a droning voice who would turn the head of absolutely no one at the neighborhood Piggly-Wiggly. But the fact is ol’ Root-‘n-Branch is one of the most outrageous figures to hit the American scene since Huey Long,...

Retiring Court of Appeals judge Janet Stumbo honored by colleagues at retirement reception

Kentucky Court of Appeals Judge Janet L. Stumbo, who serves 22 counties in Eastern Kentucky, was honored by the chief justice, her fellow Court of Appeals judges, court system employees and others at a retirement reception Dec. 14 at the Court of Appeals building in Frankfort. “On behalf of the entire court system, what can I say except thank you for your years of service and the way you have cared...

Bill Straub: ‘Root and Branch’ McConnell manages to take both sides of an issue when it suits his purpose

WASHINGTON – Senate Republican Leader Mitch “Root and Branch’’ McConnell is very much like one of those troubled volunteer fireman you hear about on occasion – the secret pyromaniac who sets the fires and then accepts the public plaudits for extinguishing them. The Louisville lawmaker’s talents are currently on full display during the debate over President Trump’s nomination of Judge...

Millersburg native to receive Henry Clay award from Kentucky Society of Washington

Staff report   The 2014 Henry Clay Distinguished Kentuckian award will be presented tonight in Washington, D.C., to William Kent Suter who grew up in Millersburg and served for 20 years as the 19th clerk of the U.S. Supreme Court.   William Kent Suter (Photo from Wikimedia Commons) The Biennial Henry Clay Dinner, at which the award will be presented, serves as a fundraiser for the Henry Clay...

Lewis Donohew: What makes the Supreme Court think we need more money in politics?

(Photo from Denver Library)   The new ruling by the U.S. Supreme Court allowing even more money to be injected into political races sets up a major test of massive paid-for persuasion versus rational discussion of issues.   In other words, will the pouring of huge amounts of cash into campaigns — even more than we’ve experienced already, if you can imagine that — permit such a bombardment...

Rick Robinson: Step aside Stewart, Colbert, for the real masters of funny, snarky news

P.J. O’Rourke first broke out his humorous journalism in “underground” newspapers in the 1960s before becoming editor-in-chief of National Lampoon and reporting on the funny parts of war from 40 countries for Rolling Stone and The Atlantic Monthly. His latest book is The Baby Boom: How It Got That Way, and It Wasn’t My Fault, and I’ll Never Do It Again. (Photo by John...

Lexington’s Steven Loy wins legal lottery, takes Supreme Court stage for Lexmark

By Judy Clabes KyForward editor   While most eyes might glaze over at the thought of deep immersion into something like “Lexmark International vs. Static Control Components Inc.,”  Steven Loy’s actually light up. The Lexington attorney is in fact animated by this “watching-paint-dry” legal case that landed him squarely in U.S. Supreme Court chambers facing a grilling by the country’s...

Robert Treadway: Paula Deen, the Supreme Court and race – Happy Fourth of July!

As we celebrate our long Fourth of July weekend, we are presented with the strange spectacle of Paula Deen having been pilloried for making racially insensitive remarks, some decades ago, while the U.S. Supreme Court removed some of the protections of the Voting Rights Act of 1965, one of the great victories of the Civil Rights Movement, on the grounds that the Deep South is no longer sufficiently...