A nonprofit publication of the Kentucky Center for Public Service Journalism

Kentucky by Heart: More possible historic events for a Kentucky-centric ‘You Are There’ TV servies

Author’s Note: This is the second of two-parts exploring what might be included if there were a ‘You Are There Kentucky’ TV series. As mentioned in part one, the included subjects are my own choices, arbitrary and I touch on only a few basic details of the events. Hopefully, they’ll spur your interest for further study. By Steve Flairty KyForward columnist The appointment of Louisa native Fred...

Constance Alexander: Vigils attract mourners of all ages, nationwide, determined to prevail

But for the whisper of new moon and random dots of starlight, the night sky was soft as a bolt of black satin on Saturday night. All over America, people congregated at courthouses to honor Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. In Murray, about forty people met in front of the Calloway County Judicial Building to celebrate the life and mourn the death of Justice Ginsburg. Her passing, of course,...

Alice Bannon: Brennan Center for Justice believes Ginsburg should not be replaced until after election

It is less than 50 days until Election Day. If Senate Majority Leader McConnell follows through on his pledge that he will consider a nominee by President Trump to succeed Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg it will be more than rank hypocrisy. It will be a full-on crisis for the country, the Supreme Court, and our democracy. The Court touches virtually every aspect of our lives — from marriage, to health...

Beshear reports 205 new COVID-19 cases, 6 deaths; urges wearing masks for best protection

As of Monday afternoon, Gov. Andy Beshear said there were at least 12,647 COVID-19 cases in Kentucky. The Governor provided updated information about coronavirus cases newly confirmed Sunday and Monday in Kentucky. On Sunday, 85 new cases of coronavirus were reported. On Monday, 120 new cases were reported. Beshear also announced one new death Sunday and five new deaths Monday. The total number of...

Many of America’s faithful say it is time to return to church, but some governors continue to disagree

By Lindsey Van Ness Pew Charitable Trusts Gathering to pray feels more important than ever for many Americans of faith, as COVID-19 cases top 2 million in the United States and communities roil with anger about police brutality and systemic racism. Yet many governors and city leaders still prohibit large religious gatherings, angering some clergy — even those who backed pandemic-related restrictions...

Cameron leads coalition in filing of amicus brief urging abortion clinic licensing remain with states

By Mark Maynard Kentucky Today Attorney General Daniel Cameron on Friday led a 17-state coalition in filing an amicus brief before the U.S. Supreme Court, saying a federal court cannot require a state to issue a license to an abortion provider. The brief argues under the U.S. Constitution the licensing of such entities is left to the states, which are responsible for developing the laws and regulations...

AG Cameron joins coalition to support requiring abortion doctors to have hospital admitting privileges

Attorney General Daniel Cameron joined 20 states in filing an amicus brief before the U.S. Supreme Court in June Medical Services, LLC v. Dr. Rebekah Gee. AG Daniel Cameron The case centers on a Louisiana law that requires abortion doctors to have admitting privileges at a local hospital in the event of an emergency or complication resulting from the procedure. The challenge to this health and safety-based...

Ky. sees new barriers to abortion after Supreme Court refuses to hear challenge to 2017 ultrasound act

By Nadia Ramlagan Public News Service Advocates for reproductive rights say women in Kentucky face yet another obstacle to receiving an abortion after the U.S. Supreme Court’s refusal this week to hear a legal challenge to a state law. The 2017 Kentucky Ultrasound Informed Consent Act mandates that doctors perform an ultrasound on women seeking an abortion and describe its images in detail....

Franklin County Court Judge Phillip Shepherd rules Kentucky’s death penalty protocol unconstitutional

By Nadia Ramlagan Public News Service A Franklin County judge has ruled the state’s protocol for carrying out the death penalty is unconstitutional. The ruling by Judge Phillip Shepherd came in response to a case filed by a group of death-row inmates, who argued corrections department regulations don’t protect people with intellectual disabilities. Kentucky spends about $10 million annually...

Sen. Thayer is at Royal Ascot, but remains focused on legalization of sports wagering in Kentucky

By Mark Hansel NKyTribune managing editor Kentucky Sen. Damon Thayer, R-Georgetown, was enjoying the pageantry of the Royal Ascot horse racing meet in England this week, but his mind (or at least part of it) was on sports wagering in the Commonwealth. Sen. Damon Thayer, R-Georgetown (left), talks with the Television Games Network at Royal Ascot Thursday about the prospects for sports wagering in Kentucky....

Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals sides with Legislative Ethics Commission on contribution and gift ban

By Tom Latek Kentucky Today The Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals has affirmed the constitutionality of the contribution and gift bans in the Kentucky Code of Legislative Ethics. The three-judge panel ruled on Thursday that the measures “enacted to prevent corruption and protect its citizens’ trust in their elected officials, comport with the Constitution,” and reversed a lower court ruling, which...

Bill Straub: True to his character, McConnell changes his stance on potential U.S. Supreme Court vacancy

WASHINGTON – Sometimes it seems Senate Republican Leader Mitch “Root-‘n-Branch’’ McConnell is bound and determined to prove to the world that he is a malevolent cad and, in the stated view of one respected historian, the “grave digger of American democracy.’’ McConnell Most successful politicians try to hide their personal flaws to attract public support. McConnell, of Louisville, forges...

Bill Straub: Bevin didn’t get a landslide, but don’t count him out; Beshear faces uphill battle

Landslide Matt Bevin, the incumbent, didn’t exactly set the world on fire in Tuesday’s Republican gubernatorial primary, garnering just 52 percent of the vote against three other jamokes who aren’t even substantial enough to be referred to as nobodies. But don’t kid yourself. When November rolls around, the Commonwealth’s least-liked-in-the-nation governor could very well earn sufficient...

Commentary: Advocates say Kentucky needs a citizen-based defense of sunshine laws

By Amye Bensenhaver 
and Jennifer P. Brown Special to KyForward Sunshine Week is upon us and with it the inevitable meteorological metaphors for open government climate change at the federal, state, and local level. These metaphors carry meaning, especially in 2019. There is no better time than now for all Kentuckians to be aware of potential serious threats to laws that protect the public’s right...

Mitch McConnell: Recent protest, intimidation attempt at Louisville restaurant didn’t ruin my meal

Recently, we’ve seen several examples that when the far left doesn’t get what it wants through the democratic process, it resorts to intimidation and mob tactics. This tendency was on full display during the debate over the nomination of Justice Brett Kavanaugh to the U.S. Supreme Court. Republican Senators and their families were targeted by the mob at their homes, at airports, and in their cars....

Bill Straub: Trump lies because he can, but with the numbers stacking up, few seem to care

WASHINGTON – On Wednesday of this week USA Today, which fancies itself a newspaper, published an op-ed piece from the president of the United States of America, one Donald J. Trump, in which he declared, among other things, that he had kept his campaign promises regarding health care, maintaining “that we would protect coverage for patients with pre-existing conditions and create new health care...

Bill Straub: It take a certain talent to spew gibberish on a consistent basis, and McConnell has talent

Looks can, indeed be deceiving. Take Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell, for example. McConnell, of Louisville, comes across as your dull, standard issue white-man-in-a-suit with a droning voice who would turn the head of absolutely no one at the neighborhood Piggly-Wiggly. But the fact is ol’ Root-‘n-Branch is one of the most outrageous figures to hit the American scene since Huey Long,...

Sen. Dorsey Ridley says Supreme Court’s decision on online sales tax good for Kentucky

Senator Dorsey Ridley, D-Henderson is hailing the decision by the U.S. Supreme Court to allow states to require online retailers to collect tax revenue owed to them. Senator Ridley has been working through the Kentucky General Assembly, its leaders and past governors to get to this stage, which will result in added revenue for the commonwealth. “This is a big deal for Kentucky,” said Senator Ridley....

Bipartisan panel formed to craft Kentucky’s sports wagering legislation in wake of Supreme Court ruling

By Tom Latek Kentucky Today A bipartisan House and Senate panel has been formed to craft legislation to allow sports wagering in Kentucky. A decision last month by the U.S. Supreme Court to allow states to decide their own fate of sports betting means, for the first time since 1992, wagering on sports will not be limited to only Nevada, Delaware, Montana and Oregon. Lawmakers are forming a panel to...

Richard Nelson: Supreme Court ruling in case of Colorado baker restores dignity to people of faith

The U.S. Supreme Court delivered a religious freedom victory to a Colorado baker who’s been through the legal wringer ever since he declined to bake a cake for a gay wedding in 2012. SCOTUS deftly sifted through the narrative that Jack Phillips’ bigotry led to unjust discrimination against a protected class. As the facts emerged, so did a distinct aftertaste of religious discrimination...