A nonprofit publication of the Kentucky Center for Public Service Journalism

Bill requiring Ky. voters to show photo ID clears House; several changes made to Senate version

By Tom Latek Kentucky Today Legislation that would require all voters to show a photo ID when arriving at the polls to vote won House approval on Tuesday after several changes were made to the Senate’s original version. Rep. James Tipton, R-Taylorsville, presented the bill to his colleagues, beginning with an amendment. He told his colleagues the old method of allowing someone to vote without showing...

Kentucky Senate passes bill requiring photo ID for voters along party lines; measure moves to House

By Tom Latek Kentucky Today Legislation requiring a photo ID in order to vote passed the Kentucky Senate along party lines on Thursday with Republicans moving the measure to the House. Sen. Robby Mills, R-Henderson, said there are alternatives for those who don’t have a photo ID, such as a driver’s license. “They may produce another form of ID such as a social security card, a credit or debit...

Ron Daley: Are we losing our democracy in the nation and in Kentucky? What’s wrong and how do we fix it?

It took nearly 200 years for the great experiment created in 1787 at the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia to become a true democracy. After 232 years America is losing elements of its democracy. The question remains will our nation and the Commonwealth of Kentucky keep their democratic framework? Historians point out that many of the delegates to the Constitutional Convention had serious reservations...

Constance Alexander: Our votes matter, casting them is the least we can do; see you at the polls!

Susan Shea won the poster contest; Kay Williamson and I came in second. We felt gypped. Our entry was better by far. All Susan did was to cut a photo of a blindfolded man from Life magazine and write the caption, “Don’t Vote Blind” in thick black crayon. Kay and I had developed a cartoon-like storyboard that promoted the importance of voting, using a pair of stick figures fashioned from brightly...

Pew Research Center: What makes a good citizen? Top responses: Voting, paying taxes, following law

By John Gramlich Pew Research Center In a Pew Research Center survey in early 2018, around three-quarters of Americans (74%) said voting in elections was very important to what it means to be a good citizen, and around seven-in-ten said the same about paying taxes (71%) and always following the law (69%). But Democrats and Republicans – as well as younger and older adults – didn’t see eye...

Grimes encourages new citizens to participate in democracy at naturalization ceremony

Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes on Friday in Frankfort encouraged 36 new citizens from 26 countries to be active participants in democracy. The citizens took the oath of citizenship at the John C. Watts Federal Building. Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes (pictured right) at Friday’s naturalization ceremony in Frankfort. (Photo courtesy of the Office of the Secretary of State)Grimes...

Grimes takes part in naturalization ceremony with Kentucky’s 141 newest citizens

Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes last week took part in her 80th naturalization ceremony since taking office, welcoming 141 new citizens from 46 countries. The ceremony occurred just before Mother’s Day weekend at the Woman’s Club of Louisville. The ceremony included the administration of the oath of citizenship required to become Americans at the federal courthouse. Grimes spoke...

December 31 is the deadline to change party registration for voting in 2018 primary election

Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes is reminding registered voters who wish to vote in another party’s May 2018 Primary Election or be a candidate as a member of another political party in the 2018 elections that they must change their registration no later than Dec. 31. “2018 is a major election year in the Commonwealth. Kentuckians will elect officials at every level – from Congress...

Rep. Mike Denham: House Bill 1 could enact a local-option sales tax, has bipartisan support

  Frankfort – There may only be 30 working days in this year’s legislative session, but it already seems like there are about twice as many major issues needing to be addressed before the General Assembly wraps up its work in late March.   Because the state operates under a two-year budget, and our constitution therefore requires larger majorities in the House and Senate to “open...