A nonprofit publication of the Kentucky Center for Public Service Journalism

Farmers can earn $10,000 in Cooperative Dove Field Program; enrollment period extended to March 10

Farmers can earn extra money and support Kentucky’s hunting heritage by participating in the Cooperative Dove Field Program offered by the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources. The program leases privately owned and managed fields for public dove hunting in the fall. Enrollment is open through March 10. “This creative program gives our farmers an additional income opportunity, and...

Cooperative Dove Field Program offered by Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources

Farmers can earn extra money and support Kentucky’s hunting heritage by participating in the Cooperative Dove Field Program offered by the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources. The program leases privately owned and managed fields for public dove hunting in the fall. Enrollment is open through March 1. “Landowners may earn up to $10,000 in the Cooperative Dove Field Program,” said...

Ryan Quarles: USMCA must be passed to protect, expand market access for American agriculture

On the heels of the successful passage of the federal farm bill, and with a new year upon us, there is a major opportunity to protect and expand market access for American agriculture in 2019: Congress must pass USMCA. The last year has been dominated by headlines about international trade and the tough tri-lateral negotiations involving the United States, Canada, and Mexico. Now, a new trade framework...

Drew and Liz White of Union County named Kentucky Farm Bureau’s 2018 Outstanding Young Farm Family

Drew and Liz White of Union County were honored as Kentucky Farm Bureau’s “2018 Outstanding Young Farm Family” at the 99th KFB Annual Meeting in Louisville. The award, given annually, recognizes a couple or individual under 35 that demonstrates the strongest farm management skills, community and KFB involvement, and consistent financial growth through their farm. “Kentucky’s agriculture...

Wheat, double-crop soybeans look profitable as Kentucky grain producers look ahead to 2019

By Katie Pratt University of Kentucky As Kentucky grain producers look ahead to 2019, they may want to consider adding wheat seeding to their plans this fall. The combination of wheat followed by double-crop soybeans is appearing to be more profitable for the upcoming marketing year compared to a corn-soybean rotation, said Todd Davis, University of Kentucky agricultural economist. “For the past...

UK plant pathologist Farman co-author of important study of a disease with potential to devastate wheat

By Carl Nathe Special to KyForward A University of Kentucky plant pathologist is part of an international team of researchers who have uncovered an important link to a disease which left unchecked could prove devastating to wheat. UK College of Agriculture, Food and Environment faculty member Mark Farman co-authored an article being published in Science, the journal of the American Association for...

UK College of Agriculture to host emergency wheat freeze damage training session on March 21

Recent freezing temperatures may have caused damage to Kentucky’s wheat crop. The University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment will host an emergency wheat freeze damage training to help producers assess potential damage and help them make appropriate management decisions. The training begins with registration at 8 a.m. CDT Tuesday, March 21 at the University of Kentucky Research...

Several days of below freezing temperatures could result in damage to Kentucky crops

Kentucky has enjoyed a mild winter which has resulted in many trees, plants and crops beginning to sprout and bloom before their usual times. The forecast for the next several days is not good news for those early bloomers. Meteorologists for the University of Kentucky Agricultural Weather Center are predicting low temps to reach into the 20s for at least five days in the upcoming week. “The National...

The high grain prices seen in 2012 are likely
to stick around through 2013, expert says

By Tim Thornberry KyForward correspondent   It was a year of records in 2012 when it comes to agriculture; some good, some not so good.   The good news was the projected breaking of the $5 billion mark in Kentucky agriculture cash receipts. More good news, at least for grain growers, came as prices neared or topped record levels.   The bad news, of course, was all this happened through...