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Torp, Blue Grass Community Foundation, Nowland-Curry win Weinberg Humanitarian awards


Tanya Torp, Blue Grass Community Foundation and the late Betsy Nowland-Curry have been selected by the Kentucky Conference for Community and Justice (“KCCJ”) and The Plantory to receive the 2016 Lauren K. Weinberg Humanitarian Awards.

Tanya Torp is a compassionate lover of community. As Program Director of Step by Step Lexington, she works to inspire and encourage young mothers through case management, counseling, and tireless support. She also serves as Executive Director of Be Bold, a nonprofit initiative which inspires girls to achieve their goals. She has opened her home, Justice House, to the community, hosting a weekly breakfast, activism trainings, and ensuring a safe place for those in need to come for help. Tanya has previously worked with United Way of the Bluegrass and currently serves as Vice Chairperson of the Central Kentucky chapter of Kentuckians for the Commonwealth.

Tanya Torp, Blue Grass Community Foundation, and the late Betsy Nowland-Curry have been selected by the Kentucky Conference for Community and Justice (“KCCJ”) and The Plantory to receive the 2016 Lauren K. Weinberg Humanitarian Awards (Photo Provided)

Tanya Torp, Blue Grass Community Foundation, and the late Betsy Nowland-Curry have been selected by the Kentucky Conference for Community and Justice (“KCCJ”) and The Plantory to receive the 2016 Lauren K. Weinberg Humanitarian Awards (Photo Provided)

Blue Grass Community Foundation helps individuals, families, businesses, communities, and nonprofit organizations establish charitable funds, guide resources to support causes, and meet community needs to make a difference. Throughout this, they have demonstrated a commitment to connecting people across economic and social sectors through philanthropy and community work.

The foundation demonstrates a continued ability to address so many issues across sectors, and to bring people together to establish lasting, committed change in Lexington. They have pursued community by intentionally listening, building local leaders, challenging individuals and organizations who prevent equity, and bravely standing up for the ideas, values, and projects they believe are right for our community. With a variety of services, BGCF connects the community with the power of philanthropy.

hey currently serve as convener projects such as The Legacy Trail, Lexington East End Equity Partnership, the Isaac Murphy MEMORIAL Art Garden, Food Works Lexington, and Arts Place America/NEA Our Town. They are proud to support local citizens who have come together to make an impact on the community in which we live.

Betsy Nowland-Curry demonstrated a lifelong commitment to humanitarian work. She founded the Spouse Abuse Center, served as director of the YWCA, worked as Executive Director of the Kentucky Commission on Women, provided support to those most in need as a social worker, and had such numerous professional humanitarian accomplishments.

Additionally, she served on many boards and volunteered tirelessly, mentoring younger women leaders and supporting the growth of such organizations as Sisters and Supporters Working Against Gun Violence. Betsy embodied the spirit of the award in her professional and personal life. She was a humanitarian in every way.

Since 1951, the Humanitarian Awards have been given to individuals and organizations in the Bluegrass whose dedication and service to our community promotes respect, understanding and tolerance among all people. The 2016 recipients were honored at an awards ceremony on Feb. 13 at The Plantory’s nonprofit coworking center.

The Humanitarian Award is given in honor of community leader and activist Lauren K. Weinberg. For more information on Lauren K. Weinberg, past recipients and the event, please visit www.plantory.org/humanitarians or call 859-255-6999.

From the Plantory Communications


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One Comment

  1. Bob Dobbs says:

    I am part of Rock castle Karst Conservancy a non profit which owns Great Saltpetre Cave Preserve near Mt Vernon. Each year we host 30-40 classes of Elementary school students and several hundred scouts. This is done under an open shelter.
    We are in desperate need of an education center to extend our educational programs on bats, caves, and water pollution.

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